Paths, parks and countryside areas

Scoska Wood

  • Distance or area: 10 hectares
  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: North Yorkshire

Scoska Wood NNR is a strip of ash woodland and pasture on the slopes of Littondale - the valley of the River Skirfare - between the villages of Litton and Arncliffe. The underlying Carboniferous Limestone has had a major influence on the reserve's plant life. Woodland clings to the limestone scars and rocky slopes and merges into herb-rich neutral pasture below.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

East Dartmoor Woods and Heaths

  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Devon

There’s something for everyone, from stunning scenery and panoramic views over Dartmoor and the coast, to great picnic spots, a range of walks and loads of wildlife to watch and photograph. East Dartmoor Woods and Heaths has now been permanently opened up for people enjoying the outdoors on foot.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

Highbury Wood

  • Distance or area: 46 hectares
  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Gloucestershire

Highbury Wood lies on the eastern bank of the River Wye and is a prime example of the very rich and diverse woodland for which the Wye Valley is internationally important. The site is noted for its variety of woodland types, reflecting the wide range of soils, aspect and drainage on the site. It has now been permanently opened up for people enjoying the outdoors on foot.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

Westleton Heath

  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Suffolk

In medieval times a large area of heath known as the Sandlings (on account of its dry sandy soils) stretched along the Suffolk coast. Today only about 20% of the heathland remains, the rest has been lost to modern farming and forestry.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

Castle Eden Dene

  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Durham

Enter a world where magical yew, oak, ash and dying elm create a home for other plants and creatures. 10,000 years of wild growth in a deep gorge has created a place you can explore again and again. Castle Eden Dene has now been permanently opened up for people enjoying the outdoors on foot.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk