Blogs

Welsh access lands

Wandering on Welsh access lands

06 April 2018 by Rebecca Brough

Wales is blessed with vast expanses of remote and entrancing countryside with 320,000 hectares of open access land - almost a third of all such land in England and Wales.

Jerry Pearlman: lawyer who fought for our rights

20 March 2018 by Kate Ashbrook

Kate Ashbrook reflects on Jerry Pearlman - an honorary solicitor for the Ramblers for more than 30 years, taking on countless path battles and campaigneing for freedom to roam on open country.

Natural neighbourhoods

06 March 2018 by Kate Conto

Parks in towns and cities are the way that most of us engage with and benefit from contact with the natural environment. It is therefore vital that the Government’s 25 year plan to improve the environment must include ambitions for urban settings.

A walk through the next 25 years

06 February 2018 by Alison Hallas

Following the launch of the Government's long-awaited 25 Year Environment Plan, our policy officer, Alison Hallas, looks at what the plan actually offers to those of us who love walking.

The benefits of access land

18 January 2018 by Guest blogger

Alan Marlow, the Ramblers Hampshire area footpath and access officer, shares his views on why open access is important.

Footsteps and heartbeats: Walks with my newborn

01 November 2017 by Jess Dolan

On her return as Ramblers Scotland director after a year on maternity leave, Jess Dolan reflects on the huge, positive impact walking has had on her life in the last 12 months.

People walking in city

Building better places for walkers

25 October 2017 by Kate Conto

Think about the places you walk everyday – to work, to shops or to the park. At some point, most of us will have been put off walking because of the design of the built environment. So how can we persuade more people to walk for short journeys?

Arthur McKenzie: A walking hero at 83

12 September 2017 by Kathrine Payne

The beautiful Pentland Hills near Edinburgh are enjoyed by 600,000 people a year; with most visiting to enjoy the area’s 100km of scenic paths and trails. Such experiences are made possible thanks to the hard work of a small army of path maintenance volunteers, including one very special 83-year-old: Arthur Mackenzie from Penicuik.

Steps down to a beach

The England Coast Past

01 September 2017 by Nicky Philpott

Nicky Philpott, director of advocacy and engagement, takes a trip down memory lane to retell the history of the England Coast Path. Find out more about how the Ramblers helped make the path a reality.

Seven Sisters South Downs

England Coast Path - the whole story

18 August 2017 by Kate Conto

Our senior policy officer Kate Conto has been involved in the England Coast Path from the start. She tells us all about the highs and lows of this inspirational project.

Botany Bay

Kent's unique coastline

11 August 2017 by Robert Peel

Our volunteer, Robert Peel, has been at the heart of the England Coast Path in Kent. He showcases the tireless work of the Kent volunteers in establishing the Kent stretch of the coast path.

The final product - a new shiny gate that improves accessibility and safety

A rRipple but no waves in North Bucks

06 June 2017 by George Redmayne

We owe much to our volunteer path maintenance teams across Britain who work tirelessly to ensure our paths are kept open and in good order. Walkers enjoy the benefits, but how many appreciate the work that goes into achieving those benefits? George Redmayne donned his outdoor gear to find out more.

Burnbank fell for blog

I have a few problems – but they're not what you might think

30 May 2017 by Simon Barnett

Imagine the scene: you’ve walked for nearly 200 miles, climbed fell after fell and your body is tired. Oh so tired. And then you hit a problem...

Mount Everest

What’s your personal Everest?

18 May 2017 by Simon Barnett

What makes us take on crazy challenges? I'm about to climb 214 fells in a fortnight or so - what's your personal Everest?

Steve's route

A history of the Wainwrights & some 214 record-breakers

08 May 2017 by Simon Barnett

Simon - who is attempting to climb all 214 Wainwrights in 15 days - runs through how the Wainwrights got their name and some of the record attempts in the Lakes.

Local elections 2017: Making the case for outdoor recreation

27 April 2017 by Helen Todd

With the 2017 local elections looming in Scotland, Helen Todd says it's vital that outdoor interests engage with local democracy.

Misinterpretation of the law?

14 February 2017 by Eugene Suggett

On 14 and 15 February we will be contending a misinterpretation of the law in the High Court of Justice.

Woodbastwick

How to get on the map

07 December 2016 by Eugene Suggett

Claiming an unrecorded right of way helps ensure a path is protected for public use, both now and in the future. Our senior policy officer, Eugene Suggett shares a recent example of how you can claim an unrecorded way.

Coast path opens

Another stretch of the coast, open for all

10 November 2016 by Alison Hallas

Alison joins Norfolk Area Ramblers in a breezy Great Yarmouth for the launch celebration for the latest stretch of the England Coast Path.

Light Switch wall art

#LoveLondonWalkLondon

09 September 2016 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero celebrates the urban, the grittiness and the street culture of London and assesses the brand new role of 'Walking and Cycling Commissioner' in the capital.

Getting along: Cyclists and walkers sharing paths

07 September 2016 by Helen Todd

Helen Todd reflects on how 'shared use' paths are working in Scotland - where cyclists, walkers, horse riders and paddlers have enjoyed equal rights of access since 2003.

Looking over to Craig Wen and Craig Lwyd

Go wild outdoors

06 June 2016 by Phil Pickin

Phil Pickin tells us why we should be going wild over the summer months – even if it’s only in our back garden

Scottish views and vistas

Manifesto for a walking Scotland

08 April 2016 by Helen Todd

As part of the 2016 Scottish Elections, there is a crying need for politicians to support walking & access, promote health, and protect the environment.

Walkers at a waterfall

Discovering the weird and wonderful thanks to CRoW

21 December 2015 by Justin Cooke

Did you know that, of the 1 million plus hectares of land across England and Wales, some 90% of them are open for the public to enjoy?

CRoW thumnail 2 735x428

Fifteen years on

30 November 2015 by Kate Ashbrook

Ramblers president Kate Ashbrook celebrates fifteen years of CRoW

andrew allen thumnail

Walking connects us to the world around us

27 October 2015 by Andrew Allen

Journalist and campaigner Andrew Allen shows how a walking challenge can mean many different things.

Walking Class Hero looking at the New York skyline

Walking Class Hero: world cities for walking

06 May 2015 by Walking Class Hero

A city’s environmental credentials are an important factor in assessing its status. Walking Class Hero takes a look at New York and Glasgow to see how accessible and user-friendly their walking routes are.

Walking Class Hero looking out to sea

Walking Class Hero: standing in the breach

22 October 2014 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero visits the Medmerry to see an innovative project by the Environment Agency to reduce flooding, offer a home for wildlife, and increase access for walkers and cyclists.

International Walk to School Month in Harlem, New York

Eugene Suggett: make the school run the school walk

20 October 2014 by Eugene Suggett

14% of children aged two to 15 are obese. Eugene considers how walking to school would undoubtedly tackle this. But first, he says, we need to ensure that drivers understand the right to walk on roads when no pavement is available.

The view from Primrose Hill

Anastasia French: the long walk north

17 October 2014 by Anastasia French

When Anastasia French bid farewell to her campaigning role at the Ramblers, she did in the only way she knew how. She walked from London to the Norfolk coast. Here's the first installment of her week-long journey.

Mount Fuji

Kate Ashbrook: tragedy on Mount Ontake

03 October 2014 by Kate Ashbrook

We were sad to hear of the hikers who were injured or killed by the Mount Ontake volcano. Our President Kate Ashbrook, who has visited Japan to talk about our path network, shares her thoughts on the role walking plays in Japanese culture.

Pumlumon, Central Wales

Benedict Southworth: All paths lead to roam

16 September 2014 by Benedict Southworth

80 years ago, people wanting to escape the city and climb mountains, or explore wild moorland risked threats, harassment, and even arrest. Now, all open country (mountains, moor, heath, down and common land) in England and Wales is open for us to roam freely. In Scotland, you can walk (and camp) almost anywhere.

Isle of Mull

Ed Wilson: What’s the story in Balamory?

12 September 2014 by Ed Wilson

Ed visits the Isle of Mull and considers the valuable contribution volunteers make to society.

Cairngorms National Park

Helen Todd: The Scottish referendum and walking

10 September 2014 by Helen Todd

With the referendum on Scottish independence imminent, we re-post an original blog from Ramblers Scotland campaigner Helen on the impacts a yes vote could have on walkers.

Dom abseiling in the Cairngorms

Dominic Bates: Mountain scrambling in the Cairngorms

29 August 2014 by Dominic Bates

Dominic Bates tries his hand (and feet) at scrambling and wonders if this is the start of his transformation from jelly-legged to celebrated mountaineer...

Moidart, near Fort William, Scotland

Helen Todd: the best coastline in the world?

26 August 2014 by Helen Todd

Helen explains that in Scotland, unlike in England and Wales, there is simply no need to campaign for a complete coast path.

Salisbury Plain

Walking Class Hero: the rule of Snot

15 August 2014 by Walking Class Hero

What does a Saxon chief called Snot, Gotham City and Dolly Parton have in common? Another walk with resident blogger Walking Class Hero of course. This month, the urban delights of Nottingham.

Loughrigg Fell

Mark Rowe: Mortal man

14 July 2014 by Mark Rowe

Mark Rowe on how he - or more accurately his wife and her lifelong cuddly penguin - survived an unexpected adventure in the Lake District.

Walking Class Hero and Timothy Bennett's plaque

Walking Class Hero: M'learned friends

04 July 2014 by Walking Class Hero

"I am unwilling to leave the world a worse place than I found it". Walking Class Hero on why the Ramblers fights to protect the things we take for granted when we go for a walk.

Walking the wyre

27 June 2014 by Ruth Somerville

With 1,200 species of butterflies and moths and some of the UK’s oldest woodland, the West Midlands’ Wyre Forest is a boon for walkers and naturalists alike. Yet for a long time, the Forest’s westernmost boundary in South Shropshire was inaccessible to walkers. Until Susan Sharp came along.

Group walk in summer

Parks and urban green space: back to the 80s?

26 June 2014 by Tom Fewins

A city’s parks and open spaces are often referred to as its ‘green lungs’, however new research published today by The Heritage Lottery Fund suggests those lungs are in serious danger of running out of air.

Chris Grogan walking away from Dentdale

I'll take the high way

16 June 2014 by Chris Grogan

"It started out as a game. Something my husband and I played when we were out walking together." Chris Grogan on how and why she and her husband created the long-distance route A Dales Way in Yorkshire.

Ben Bheoil

Time for an adventure!

10 June 2014 by Helen Todd

To go into the outdoors is to challenge yourself and leave behind the trappings of your comfortable, daily routine. Helen's latest blog is on how to enjoy planned adventures and survuve unintended ones!

Path maintenance volunteers

It's time to say thank you

02 June 2014 by Ed Wilson

It's Volunteers Week and we want to take a minute to stop and say thank you. Thank you for giving your time, skills and energy to the Ramblers and ensuring we can do what we do.

St Agnes viaduct, Cornwall

To the land's end

06 May 2014 by Sarah Gardner

At the land's end, a newly opened path that "climbs through tranquil woodland, with bluebell and wild garlic, and crosses a gentle stream full of the sounds of cascading water to take in a disused viaduct, home to curling ivy and nesting wild bees".

Walking near cows, Wyredale Way, Lancashire. Credit to Ian Dickin

Walking near cows: keep calm and carry on

01 May 2014 by Dominic Bates

Dominic Bates, editor of Walk Magazine, 'fesses up to his fear of cattle and following some advice from a beef farmer learns how to walk near cows with confidence.

Eugene Suggett with Scarborough Ramblers and Robert Goodwill MP

Transported to Turkey Carpet

28 April 2014 by Eugene Suggett

Eugene joins Scarborough Ramblers and Robert Goodwill MP for a walk through Hilda Wood, near Hackness to enjoy the ramsons and to "air a few issues of national importance".

St Pancras Old Church

Myths and legacy

24 April 2014 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero explores Kings Cross and discovers how old and new sit alongside one another with tales of the Iceni, Harry Potter, the Beatles and the cross itself.

River Lee

I can't remember colours...

18 April 2014 by Julie Dexter

Julie Dexter on her first time volunteering as a blind guide with the Capital Walkers and the London Blind Rambling Club. Walking with the inspirational and poetic Mafoud, she explores the Lee Navigation.

European Ramblers enjoying a walk

Common ground in Copenhagen

14 April 2014 by Helen Todd

Helen Todd takes a trip to Copenhagen to talk walking (and cycling) with the European Ramblers' Association.

A road, Salisbury Plains

Project ubique

25 March 2014 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero visits the prehistoric Salisbury Plains and learns how the MoD is doing its level best to improve access to the magical and mythical terrain, via Project Ubique.

South Cotswolds Ramblers walking near the set of BBC's Larkrise to Candleford, Oxfordshire

A living museum

20 March 2014 by Ed Wilson

Historic paths are like a living museum, but their stories keep growing and changing as more feet pass over them. Ed ponder the importance of historic paths and the the footpath that links the real Larkrise to Candleford, in Oxfordshire.

Path sign

Signs of the times

17 March 2014 by Eugene Suggett

Hundreds of articles, bringing fascinating insights to aspects of footpath law, have landed on this blogger’s desk since 1990. Contributors have included lawyers, historians, representatives of the farming and landowning interests and local authority staff.

Butterfly on plant

What is the value of nature?

12 March 2014 by Kate Conto

Can we ever place an economic value on the natural environment and everything it does for us? Shouldn’t we just look after nature because it is the right thing to do morally?

The Boy, aka Alfie the dog

Mysterious mills and marshes

03 February 2014 by Chris Woodley-Stewart

In the third of a series of blogs on walking in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Chris Woodley-Stewart and The Boy (Alfie the Collie) explore the wild Suffolk Coast at the turning of the year.

Urban footpath

Four wheels good, two legs bad

21 January 2014 by Eugene Suggett

Eugene Suggett ponders the nature of 'privacy' when it comes to public paths that run past people's houses.

Three young adventurers

Let's go on an adventure

09 December 2013 by Elly Hannigan Popp

How can we engage young people in the outdoors? Elly Hannigan Popp says it's really quite simple. We need to motivate them and provide them with the skills and experience that will help them in their future development.

Fighting the Godmanchester case

Nothing more than cheap headlines?

19 November 2013 by Eugene Suggett

Eugene Suggett explains why judicial review is important in ensuring whether a public body such as the government, or a council, has acted within its powers or applied the law correctly in doing so.

Helen on Sgurr na Banachdich

Is citizen action the next step for walkers?

15 November 2013 by Helen Todd

Helen Todd wonders if mobilising walkers via social media is the best way to resolve access issues in Scotland. What do you think?

Steps on a historic path in Snowdonia, Wales

Oldest inscriptions on the land

15 May 2013 by Eugene Suggett

Ancient features like footpaths, and packhorse-trails, and driftways and halterways, and holloways and coffin-ways and pilgrim-ways are as much a part of our heritage as things on which we’d never now dream of setting a bulldozer such as stonehenges and castles.

Ramblers badge

If you enjoy walking thank a Rambler

30 July 2012 by Benedict Southworth

It’s hard to imagine what the world was like without the right to roam, national trails, and even rights of way on the Ordnance Survey maps. All things the Ramblers can be proud of...

Wartime Morley College

100 not out

17 April 2012 by Walking Class Hero

There’s a lot of talk about legacy these days. A lot of us walkers love our history. Mention the Ridgeway, for example, and more often than not you’ll be told that much of the 139km/87 miles National Trail follows an ancient chalk ridge route used by prehistoric man.

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