Blogs archive

aonoch eagrach thumnail

The Munros and the joy of bagging

18 September 2015 by Helen Todd

Helen Todd explores her passion for bagging in the mountains of Scotland

Sagitta constellation by Keith Moseley

Stargazing: Cepheus, the father of Princess Andromeda

14 September 2015 by Brian Jones

Autumn highlights for astronomers include a total lunar eclipse on 28 September and the chance to spot the constellation of Cepheus.

Byway Open to All Traffic

The Big Pathwatch

01 September 2015 by Walking Class Hero

With the Big Pathwatch moving into high gear, one walker describes the joy of discovery fuelled by the project.

Sagitta constellation by Keith Moseley

Stargazing: finding a little arrow in the summer sky

25 August 2015 by Brian Jones

Walk’s resident stargazer Brian Jones introduces us to Sagitta, a tiny but distinctive constellation resembling a tiny dart, which is often linked to the hero Hercules or to Cupid, the god of love.

Bee on flower by James Petts

Phil Pickin: the future of our bees

25 August 2015 by Phil Pickin

As fruits and foods ripen this autumn, Phil Pickin reflects on the importance of bees and why they need protecting…

Goldcrest bird by John Harding

Paul Stancliffe: autumn bird migration

25 August 2015 by Paul Stancliffe

From his expert perch at the British Trust for Ornithology, Paul Stancliffe explains what to look for as the UK’s birdlife migrates in the autumn…

Boots in a row

Volunteering: What's next?

08 June 2015 by Ed Wilson

Trees

Our volunteers: our heartbeat

04 June 2015 by Kate Ashbrook

What other organisation can boast that one in every five of its members are active volunteers?

Mole above ground

Phil Pickin: Discover the wildlife right under your feet

12 May 2015 by Phil Pickin

Wildlife expert Phil Pickin urges us all to take note of the wildlife that’s right under our feet.

Walking Class Hero looking at the New York skyline

Walking Class Hero: world cities for walking

06 May 2015 by Walking Class Hero

A city’s environmental credentials are an important factor in assessing its status. Walking Class Hero takes a look at New York and Glasgow to see how accessible and user-friendly their walking routes are.

Glen Affric

Helen Todd: the dangers of sedentary lifestyles

01 May 2015 by Helen Todd

Ramblers Scotland believes there is a growing public recognition of the need for one change which no political party is putting centre stage – the dangers of our sedentary lifestyles.

woodpecker

Paul Stancliffe on exploring woodlands this summer

28 April 2015 by Paul Stancliffe

As summer gets into full swing, Paul Stancliffe tells us why it’s the perfect time of year for birdwatching in Britain’s beautiful and abundant woodland

Sextan

Brian Jones: what to look for in April’s night sky

21 April 2015 by Brian Jones

Walk’s resident stargazer Brian Jones introduces us to the constellation of Sextans (the sextant), which is most visible in April

Deserted boat

Walking Class Hero: something in the air

25 March 2015 by Walking Class Hero

These days winter for me is touring the country talking at Ramblers Area AGMs and it’s great to get out and meet old friends as well as making new ones.

Rainbow

Phil Pickin: the impact of the red sky at night

27 February 2015 by Phil Pickin

Wildlife writer Phil Pickin explains how the weather changes the wildlife that we see through the changing seasons

swallow

Paul Stancliffe: spare a thought for weary wings this spring

27 February 2015 by Paul Stancliffe

The British Trust of Ornithology Paul Stancliffe considers what it takes for our birdlife to arrive in time for spring

Taurus

Brian Jones: all about Taurus

27 February 2015 by Brian Jones

Ramblers’ resident stargazer Brian Jones gives us reasons to head outside and check out the night sky, as well as a sneak peak at the details of his new book on stargazing

People walking

Helen Todd: sit less, walk more

09 January 2015 by Helen Todd

Helen Todd tells us why we should all sit less and walk more in our every day lives

Beautiful fields

Anastasia French: hiking to Hertfordshire

07 January 2015 by Anastasia French

Here's the second instalment of Anastasia's week-long north walk.

East Loch Lomond sign

Helen Todd: camping in Scotland - to ban, or not to ban

22 December 2014 by Helen Todd

Campaign manager for Ramblers Scotland discusses the impact of camping bans in Scotland.

Yelha

Paul Stancliffe: Enjoy winter's bird bounty

28 November 2014 by Paul Stancliffe

Paul Stancliffe from the British Trust for Ornithology talks about changing birdlife to look out for in the UK in autumn

Funghi

Sheila Spence: winter foraging and Chinese 'ear' soup...

25 November 2014 by Sheila Spence

berries

Phil Pickin: And you thought autumn was a quiet time of the year?

12 November 2014 by Phil Pickin

One of the most impressive times of the year, regular blogger, Phil Pickin explains why autumn is active, interesting, and seriously colourful

Pisces constellation

Brian Jones sees heavenly fishes in the autumn sky

30 October 2014 by Brian Jones

Providing a sky-high reason to wrap up warm this winter and head outdoors, Brian Jones tells us how to spot Pisces

Walking Class Hero looking out to sea

Walking Class Hero: standing in the breach

22 October 2014 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero visits the Medmerry to see an innovative project by the Environment Agency to reduce flooding, offer a home for wildlife, and increase access for walkers and cyclists.

International Walk to School Month in Harlem, New York

Eugene Suggett: make the school run the school walk

20 October 2014 by Eugene Suggett

14% of children aged two to 15 are obese. Eugene considers how walking to school would undoubtedly tackle this. But first, he says, we need to ensure that drivers understand the right to walk on roads when no pavement is available.

The view from Primrose Hill

Anastasia French: the long walk north

17 October 2014 by Anastasia French

When Anastasia French bid farewell to her campaigning role at the Ramblers, she did in the only way she knew how. She walked from London to the Norfolk coast. Here's the first installment of her week-long journey.

Mount Fuji

Kate Ashbrook: tragedy on Mount Ontake

03 October 2014 by Kate Ashbrook

We were sad to hear of the hikers who were injured or killed by the Mount Ontake volcano. Our President Kate Ashbrook, who has visited Japan to talk about our path network, shares her thoughts on the role walking plays in Japanese culture.

Pumlumon, Central Wales

Benedict Southworth: All paths lead to roam

16 September 2014 by Benedict Southworth

80 years ago, people wanting to escape the city and climb mountains, or explore wild moorland risked threats, harassment, and even arrest. Now, all open country (mountains, moor, heath, down and common land) in England and Wales is open for us to roam freely. In Scotland, you can walk (and camp) almost anywhere.

Isle of Mull

Ed Wilson: What’s the story in Balamory?

12 September 2014 by Ed Wilson

Ed visits the Isle of Mull and considers the valuable contribution volunteers make to society.

Cairngorms National Park

Helen Todd: The Scottish referendum and walking

10 September 2014 by Helen Todd

With the referendum on Scottish independence imminent, we re-post an original blog from Ramblers Scotland campaigner Helen on the impacts a yes vote could have on walkers.

Wood cauliflower

Sheila Spence talks autumn recipes and foraging

08 September 2014 by Sheila Spence

Sheila Spence goes autumn foraging and shares her recipe for wood cauliflower pieces.

Wigtownshire Ramblers trying to cross a major trunk road - credit to the Glebe Blog

Eugene Suggett: More time to cross and more places, too, please

04 September 2014 by Eugene Suggett

As Living Streets campaign for more time for people to cross busy roads, Eugene explains why government needs to put the pedestrian at the top of the chain.

Fieldfare - John Harding/BTO

Paul Stancliffe looks forward to this year’s autumn bird migration

02 September 2014 by Paul Stancliffe

From the British Trust of Ornithology, Paul Stancliffe explains how to enjoy the migration season this autumn!

Dom abseiling in the Cairngorms

Dominic Bates: Mountain scrambling in the Cairngorms

29 August 2014 by Dominic Bates

Dominic Bates tries his hand (and feet) at scrambling and wonders if this is the start of his transformation from jelly-legged to celebrated mountaineer...

Moidart, near Fort William, Scotland

Helen Todd: the best coastline in the world?

26 August 2014 by Helen Todd

Helen explains that in Scotland, unlike in England and Wales, there is simply no need to campaign for a complete coast path.

Anastasia taking a break at Kinder Scout

Anastasia French: my top 5 reasons for walking

20 August 2014 by Anastasia French

When Ana injured her knee, she discovered how vital walking was to her physical and mental wellbeing. It wasn't just rambles that were out of the question, but socialising, her independence and her freedom. These are her top 5 reasons why walking is wonderful.

Salisbury Plain

Walking Class Hero: the rule of Snot

15 August 2014 by Walking Class Hero

What does a Saxon chief called Snot, Gotham City and Dolly Parton have in common? Another walk with resident blogger Walking Class Hero of course. This month, the urban delights of Nottingham.

Benedict Southworth

Benedict Southworth: Get outdoors

07 August 2014 by Benedict Southworth

Benedict talks about how the need to get people into the outdoors and experience that unique feeling of exploring your own country on foot is as important as ever.

Helen Todd gets active at the seaside

Helen Todd: Summer walking

04 August 2014 by Helen Todd

Summer evenings are the perfect way to get into new habits of increased activity. You have literally nothing to lose – apart perhaps from a few kilos! – and plenty to gain.

Summer star constellations

The stars of the summer - Brian Jones explains

28 July 2014 by Brian Jones

We all hope for blue skies in the summer, but at night time the heavens can be equally spectacular as Brian Jones explains

Fox Illustration - Bonnie Friend

Nightlife: Phil Pickin talks about wildlife after dark

16 July 2014 by Phil Pickin

From wary badgers to majestic deer, campaigner and avid walker, Phil Pickin, talks about nocturnal wildlife and how to spot it - if you’re lucky!

Walking Class Hero and Timothy Bennett's plaque

Walking Class Hero: M'learned friends

04 July 2014 by Walking Class Hero

"I am unwilling to leave the world a worse place than I found it". Walking Class Hero on why the Ramblers fights to protect the things we take for granted when we go for a walk.

Private sign in Navestock

Diversion tactics

24 June 2014 by Anastasia French

Anastasia joins volunteers in Essex to learn how they decide which path diversion applications to accept and which to oppose, and to see how they negotiate with landowners and council officers.

Glenfinnan viaduct

A scene so stern as that dread lake

12 June 2014 by Eugene Suggett

Eugene undertakes a Scottish adventure, walking the 8 miles from Elgol to the remote and dramatic Loch Coruisk "with its dark ledge of barren stone".

Ben Bheoil

Time for an adventure!

10 June 2014 by Helen Todd

To go into the outdoors is to challenge yourself and leave behind the trappings of your comfortable, daily routine. Helen's latest blog is on how to enjoy planned adventures and survuve unintended ones!

Ramblers volunteers

What should volunteering look like?

04 June 2014 by Ed Wilson

Volunteers are the bedrock of the Ramblers - without our volunteers we wouldn't exist to keep paths open and people walking. So it's essential that we offer the best support to them and so we're asking, if you were starting as a volunteer what would you most need?

Path maintenance volunteers

It's time to say thank you

02 June 2014 by Ed Wilson

It's Volunteers Week and we want to take a minute to stop and say thank you. Thank you for giving your time, skills and energy to the Ramblers and ensuring we can do what we do.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: V

29 May 2014 by Christopher Somerville

V is for vixen, specifically the very beautiful animal who came at me out of a moonlit cornfield.

Wasp

Ouch!

28 May 2014 by Phil Pickin

Although the summer weather encourages wildlife to get evermore active, some of these active members of the natural world are less welcome than others.

Black Guillemot

Seaside visitors

27 May 2014 by Paul Stancliffe

From rare gulls to speeding Peregrines, Walk's resident birdwatcher takes a tour around the entire UK coastline – revealing what birds to look for this summer, and where best to spot them.

Wild Garlic

Fresh growth

26 May 2014 by Sheila Spence

Early summer provides a wealth of young leaves and fungi, in particular the easily recognised Giant Puffball, golden Apricot smelling Girolles and bright yellow Chicken of the Woods to name but a few.

Walking Class Hero at the Sarah Records themed walks in Bristol

Maritime city

23 May 2014 by Walking Class Hero

For Get Walking Week, our very own award-winning Walking Class Hero joined "Between Hello and Goodbye: The Secret World of Sarah Records" themed walks around Bristol.

St Agnes viaduct, Cornwall

To the land's end

06 May 2014 by Sarah Gardner

At the land's end, a newly opened path that "climbs through tranquil woodland, with bluebell and wild garlic, and crosses a gentle stream full of the sounds of cascading water to take in a disused viaduct, home to curling ivy and nesting wild bees".

Walking near cows, Wyredale Way, Lancashire. Credit to Ian Dickin

Walking near cows: keep calm and carry on

01 May 2014 by Dominic Bates

Dominic Bates, editor of Walk Magazine, 'fesses up to his fear of cattle and following some advice from a beef farmer learns how to walk near cows with confidence.

Eugene Suggett with Scarborough Ramblers and Robert Goodwill MP

Transported to Turkey Carpet

28 April 2014 by Eugene Suggett

Eugene joins Scarborough Ramblers and Robert Goodwill MP for a walk through Hilda Wood, near Hackness to enjoy the ramsons and to "air a few issues of national importance".

St Pancras Old Church

Myths and legacy

24 April 2014 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero explores Kings Cross and discovers how old and new sit alongside one another with tales of the Iceni, Harry Potter, the Beatles and the cross itself.

Brian Jones

The celestial lion and her cub

16 April 2014 by Brian Jones

The distinctive shape of Leo is unmistakeable – it is one of the few groups actually resembling the object or character that it depicts, in this case the Nemean lion which Hercules slew as the first of his twelve labours.

European Ramblers enjoying a walk

Common ground in Copenhagen

14 April 2014 by Helen Todd

Helen Todd takes a trip to Copenhagen to talk walking (and cycling) with the European Ramblers' Association.

Gloucestershire

The good life

10 April 2014 by Emma Bovill

We spend a lot more time looking at our local Ordnance Survey map (Explorer OL45) these days... we’re concentrating on just a few folds at the moment but there’s plenty of time to fan out further as we dip our toes deeper into country life in the Cotswolds.

Mars

Red planet rising

09 April 2014 by Brian Jones

The Red Planet has returned! Every couple of years, Mars is particularly well placed in the evening sky as it reaches the point in its orbit around the Sun. Walk's resident Starman takes a look at this enigmatic planet.

A road, Salisbury Plains

Project ubique

25 March 2014 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero visits the prehistoric Salisbury Plains and learns how the MoD is doing its level best to improve access to the magical and mythical terrain, via Project Ubique.

South Cotswolds Ramblers walking near the set of BBC's Larkrise to Candleford, Oxfordshire

A living museum

20 March 2014 by Ed Wilson

Historic paths are like a living museum, but their stories keep growing and changing as more feet pass over them. Ed ponder the importance of historic paths and the the footpath that links the real Larkrise to Candleford, in Oxfordshire.

Path sign

Signs of the times

17 March 2014 by Eugene Suggett

Hundreds of articles, bringing fascinating insights to aspects of footpath law, have landed on this blogger’s desk since 1990. Contributors have included lawyers, historians, representatives of the farming and landowning interests and local authority staff.

Anastasia reaches the sea!

South to the sea - the final leg

06 March 2014 by Anastasia French

Like the author Laurie Lee, Anastasia woke up one morning with a desire to walk south to the sea. In her final leg, disaster strikes and her most trusty companion - her Ordnance Survey map - blows out of my rucksack, never to be seen again. Will she still make it to the sea?

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: U

28 February 2014 by Christopher Somerville

U is for Umbrella, that quintessentially British piece of outdoor equipment – characterful, stoical, faintly but unmistakeably laughable.

Paul Stancliffe

Top five birds to see this spring

27 February 2014 by Paul Stancliffe

Spring is always an exciting time for birdwatchers, as some of our most iconic birds return after spending the long winter months in Africa. Here are five birds to watch out for this season.

Shiela Spence

Gather spring mushrooms and morels – even in urban areas

26 February 2014 by Sheila Spence

As the days get longer and hopefully warmer we look to the woodlands for the delights of wild fungi to tempt our taste buds.

Phil Pickin

Citizen science

25 February 2014 by Phil Pickin

Carrying out research when you are out walking may not be everyone's idea of fun. But for those who do it, it can make a trip into the outdoors even more interesting and can provide research organisations with much needed and very valuable data.

Brian Jones

Canis Major

24 February 2014 by Brian Jones

Brilliant Capella is the leading star in the constellation Auriga, the Charioteer, a conspicuous group which resembles a large circlet of stars.

Helen at A'Bhuidheanach Beag

Winter walking gear

21 February 2014 by Helen Todd

Helen on how to survive walking the hills in winter with the right planning, equipment and of course spare pockets filled with bags of nuts, chocolate and flapjack bars!

Walk Reader Awards

Walk Reader Awards review

19 February 2014 by Walk Magazine

Get the lowdown post-Walk Reader Awards, including the best gear as voted by you.

Path closure notice

An emotional iced bun

13 February 2014 by Anastasia French

Like the author Laurie Lee, Anastasia woke up one morning with a desire to walk south to the sea. In her penultimate installment she finds the going tough, and wonders who she can turn to for an "emotional iced bun".

Learning how to tie my laces

If the boots fit, wear them

10 February 2014 by Emma Bovill

Looking for some new walking boots? Well this might give you some good tips. Emma tries a free boot-fitting from Cotswold Outdoor and learns some valuable information, including how to tie her laces.

Je Thames plaque

Estuary english

05 February 2014 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero meditates on the transitional nature of estuaries by visiting Burnham-on-Crouch, on a gunmetal grey overcast day.

The Boy, aka Alfie the dog

Mysterious mills and marshes

03 February 2014 by Chris Woodley-Stewart

In the third of a series of blogs on walking in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Chris Woodley-Stewart and The Boy (Alfie the Collie) explore the wild Suffolk Coast at the turning of the year.

Urban footpath

Four wheels good, two legs bad

21 January 2014 by Eugene Suggett

Eugene Suggett ponders the nature of 'privacy' when it comes to public paths that run past people's houses.

Mole from Kenneth Grahame's Wind in the Willows, by EH Shephard

The simple joys of the outdoors

15 January 2014 by Ed Wilson

The simple joys of "rambling busily, along the hedgerows, across the copses" as epitomised by Mole in Wind in the Willows, have only been made possible by the unique network of footpaths. Which is why some of the statistics quoted in the recent 'Paths in Crisis' report concern Ed.

Ana enjoyed a game of pooh sticks

South to the sea - 100 akers of fun

13 January 2014 by Anastasia French

Like the author Laurie Lee, Anastasia woke up one morning with a desire to walk south to the sea. In her fifth installment she is walking through the 100 Aker Wood.

The wild, wide Thames, Dartford, Kent

A walk on the wild side

02 January 2014 by Sarah Gardner

“This is Kent, but not the garden of England. This is a walk through the edgelands, where everything is in a state of flux … where human endeavours, great and marginal, crop up quickly, flourish and decay, leaving only remains.” Sarah takes a walk on the wild side.

The giant hand

So fair a fancy

24 December 2013 by Eugene Suggett

Eugene takes a winter walk in Dorset and reflects on antiquities, orpas and superstition.

Winter walking in a snow-clad Surrey

Winter walking

21 December 2013 by Sarah Gardner

As a child of the summer, Sarah always dreaded the long winter months. And then she discovered the magic of winter walking.

Footpath signs

A very British icon

19 December 2013 by Ed Wilson

Ed Wilson ruminates on the importance of the humble footpath sign and why he beleives it is an icon of the British countryside.

Pedestrians do not frack!

South to the Sea part 4 – fracking around

17 December 2013 by Anastasia French

Like the author Laurie Lee, Anastasia woke up one morning with a desire to walk south to the sea. In her fourth installment she is joined by her dad, her best friend and someone called Chick who used to know Aung San Suu Kyi, as she attempts to see some fracking.

Walking in Blackheath

Walking works

11 December 2013 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero on Nietzsche, Charles Dickens, Agatha Christie and why walking really does work.

Ouse Valley Viaduct, Sussex

Ramblers Route review: autumn abundance

06 December 2013 by Sarah Gardner

"It had been a while since I'd done a solo hike. I love walking with friends and with organised groups, but nothing beats setting off down the open road with just a rucksack for company..." Sarah reviews a route full of autumnal charm in Sussex.

Mill at Lower Slaughter, the Cotswolds

100 years of walking

05 December 2013 by Emma Bovill

As a co-operative HF Holidays is inherently social, with breaks designed for groups of friends or families, or guided walks you can join if holidaying on your own. Emma explores the options on an open day in the Cotswolds.

Paul Stancliffe

The great goose winter spectacular

03 December 2013 by Paul Stancliffe

During the winter months Britain and Ireland are among the best places in the world to spot wild geese – and getting to grips with them also offers plenty of opportunities to enjoy some spectacular walks.

Phil Pickin

Restoring our precious peatlands

02 December 2013 by Phil Pickin

Despite the fact that peatland can seem featureless and rather flat, it provides us with a number of vital services: storing carbon, mitigating flooding and providing precious habitat for a range of plants and animals.

Brian Jones

The great comet

28 November 2013 by Brian Jones

Comet ISON is what astronomers class as a sungrazing comet. The moment of closest approach to the Sun of any object orbiting it is known as the perihelion, sungrazers being a class of comet that pass extremely close to the Sun. Comet ISON passes perihelion tonight – at which point it will approach to around 1,160,000 kilometres (730,000 miles) of the solar surface.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: T

27 November 2013 by Christopher Somerville

T is for Thermos – and thermals, too, and thin layers, and thick overtrousers, and all the other stuff my dad would never have dreamed of taking with him on a winter walk.

Shiela Spence

Wintery wild food

26 November 2013 by Sheila Spence

Even as the winter chill sets in there are still plenty of wild foods to search out and enjoy. Walk Magazine's resident forager reveals what to look for this season.

Sidmouth, Devon

My addiction to long-distance paths

21 November 2013 by Peter Hyde

Peter Hyde describes the attraction - and addiction - of long-distance paths: "the sense of cumulative progress, of discovery, the feeling of wholeness when the path has the sort of natural integrity, and of course a feeling of achievement."

Fighting the Godmanchester case

Nothing more than cheap headlines?

19 November 2013 by Eugene Suggett

Eugene Suggett explains why judicial review is important in ensuring whether a public body such as the government, or a council, has acted within its powers or applied the law correctly in doing so.

Helen on Sgurr na Banachdich

Is citizen action the next step for walkers?

15 November 2013 by Helen Todd

Helen Todd wonders if mobilising walkers via social media is the best way to resolve access issues in Scotland. What do you think?

Alfie - faithful mud-hound, water-lover and cheese fiend

An autumn walk(ies) in the Mendips

13 November 2013 by Chris Woodley-Stewart

In the second in a series of blogs on walking in our Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) Chris Woodley-Stewart, Director of the North Pennines AONB Partnership, visits the Mendip Hills and gets very wet.

Missing sign posts in Surrey

South to the sea part 3 - Rude tired

11 November 2013 by Anastasia French

Like the author Laurie Lee, Anastasia woke up one morning with a desire to walk south to the sea - and she did it! In the third installment she has a near death experience and gets rude tired...

Land's Emd

To be beside the seaside

07 November 2013 by Ruth Livingstone

Ruth Livingstone has been walking around the British coastline in stages for the last three years. She tells us about discovering new and wonderful things in "this in-between place, where the sea meets the land".

Kate Ashbrook at the kissing gate she installed at Cobstone Hill, Turville, in the Chilterns

Defending access to the outdoors

04 November 2013 by Kate Ashbrook

Kate Ashbrook talks about what inspired her to start campaigning to defend access to the outdoors and why it's as important as ever in these austere times.

Horn's Cross, Dartmoor

Virtual halloween walk

31 October 2013 by Two Blondes

With Halloween's arrival, Two Blondes thought it might be interesting to take you on a Virtual Halloween Walk from East to West along the Dartmoor 666 Northing.

Ramblers staff and stakeholders at Victoria Tower Gardens, by Westminster

It's good to talk

30 October 2013 by Ruth Chambers

It’s not every day that a government minister says ‘we need you’ but that’s exactly what Environment Secretary Owen Paterson did yesterday emphasising the importance of expertise, passion and local understanding that organisations like the Ramblers bring to the table.

Horton Country Park

South to the sea part 2 - starting out solo

29 October 2013 by Anastasia French

Like the author Laurie Lee, Anastasia woke up one morning with a desire to walk south to the sea - and she did it! In the second instalment she starts out solo and find it less of a walk in the park...

An American woodland during Fall

Walking away the blues

28 October 2013 by The Long Walker

The Long Walker on why walking in autumn can help shake off the melancholy blues.

Walking with Simon Armitage at Westward Ho!

Westward Ho!

24 October 2013 by Walking Class Hero

I was in North Devon to join the poet Simon Armitage and walk a stretch of the South West Coast Path. A couple of years ago I accompanied Simon on a section of the Pennine Way for his book Walking Home, this year he’s writing the follow-up, imaginatively entitled Walking Away.

Paul Carter on the Broomway

The most perilous path

22 October 2013 by Paul Carter

Paul Carter describes his intense experience of walking the Broomway to Foulness Island: "The poor visibility that can rapidly envelope the sands and the ease by which it is possible to become disorientated and end up walking out to sea, mean that many people have died over the years by making the wrong judgment on this very hazardous route."

Ordnance Survey maps

South to the sea - part 1

18 October 2013 by Anastasia French

Like the author Laurie Lee, Anastasia woke up one morning with the idea to walk south to the sea - and she did it! In this first instalment she has Big Ben, some Elvis Presley lookalikes and a herd of deer for company as she heads southwest along the Thames Path.

Dylan Thomas School path maintenance volunteering

At the heart of walking

16 October 2013 by Ed Wilson

Whether clearing overgrowth, checking path diversions, leading a walk around a city park or national park, making sure the finances are in order or coordinating the management committee, every single volunteer helps to keep you walking.

Cumbrian Rambler

Getting kids outdoors

11 October 2013 by Cumbrian Rambler

It’s only been a few weeks but already I have more postcards to share from young adventurers enjoying the outdoors!

Epping Forest

A rare resource

09 October 2013 by Sarah Gardner

By far the most special thing about Epping Forest is that it’s held in trust as a place for people to enjoy forever.

Michelle Roberts

Walking works

07 October 2013 by Michelle Roberts

It’s wonderful to see Walking for Health release 'Walking Works', a comprehensive summary of evidence for physical activity, specifically walking. This report makes the facts very clear; staying still kills and walking works.

Emma at the Isle of Wight

Britain's best view?

03 October 2013 by Emma Bovill

What makes up a great view? The effort it takes to walk to a viewpoint or the unexpectedness of what you find? Or does a great view have something you simply can't explain?

Helen on Sgurr na Banachdich

Reaching for the Skye

01 October 2013 by Helen Todd

So here I am, roped, harnessed and helmeted, clinging on to a narrow, rocky, vertical ridge, which juts out like a 50-metre high shark’s fin from the mountain below. I’m inching along its spine, and I daren’t risk looking down at the sheer drops on either side...

Cumbrian Rambler

Young adventurers

26 September 2013 by Cumbrian Rambler

Latest research shows that half of 7 year olds do not exercise enough. So I thought I’d round up some kids who love the great outdoors and maybe they will inspire others to get out there and have some fun!

Bath skyline

Summer lovin'

24 September 2013 by Walking Class Hero

Whilst we look forward to autumn with early fogs and a hint of crisp in the air, Walking Class Hero is reminiscing about the wonderful summer of walking. But what would have made it even better?

Botany Bay, Thanet Coastal Path

Unexpected remoteness

19 September 2013 by Eugene Suggett

The sandy beaches and inlets and caves make Botany Bay an attraction ... the awesome sea-stacks, fashioned over time from the chalk cliffs by the waves, give it the type of desolate eeriness not normally expected.

The ice-cream team

Making the case for coast

16 September 2013 by Anastasia French

A few years ago Government agreed to make a path around England’s coast – a very special path that opens up all beaches and foreshores and rolls back when nature takes over. At the time, it was hoped that we’d get that path within 10 years. 4 years on and there’s only one small stretch open.

Walkers in Weardale, credit Simon Wilson

The roof of England

13 September 2013 by Chris Woodley-Stewart

As the Director of the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Chris Woodley-Stewart is a lucky man. He works in the "true north" where Cumbria, Northumberland and County Durham meet. Find out more about walking in what he calls a "wild and wonderful place".

Walking the Wales Coast Path, credit William Renwick

When I walked out one morning

12 September 2013 by William Renwick

One April morning William Renwick packed a bag, slipped on his boots and walked out of his front door to begin a 1,040 mile adventure around the Wales Coast Path. Here is the second-part of his blog, where a storm cuts through his idyllic amblings. Will he make it home?

Benedict Southworth on a Walk 'n' Talk

Go all out for the great outdoors debate

09 September 2013 by Benedict Southworth

We are the organisation that works for walkers, and with 9 million of you in England alone, we want to make sure we are representing your views, if the Ramblers is to steer the right course over the next few years.

Brian's views about the outdoors

On a Walk n Talk

06 September 2013 by Mary Gough

We've started a big conversation with people all over the country to find out how to make the outdoors even more enjoyable, and determine our vision for the next 10 years. One of our volunteers, Mary, talks about the conversations she's been having with people who love the outdoors.

Wales Coast Path

Wales from my doorstep

04 September 2013 by William Renwick

One April morning William Renwick packed a bag, slipped on his boots and walked out of his front door to begin a 1,040 mile adventure around the newly opened Wales Coast Path. In part one of a special two-part blog, he describes stepping out one mid-spring morning...

Coastal access

Coasting along to nowhere?

02 September 2013 by Dominic Bates

Dominic Bates, editor of walk magazine, talks about the future of the England Coast Path and the challenges of keeping the magazine ahead of the game.

Brian Jones

The Fox

30 August 2013 by Brian Jones

The constellation of Vulpecula (The Fox) is small and relatively faint, but ideally placed for viewing during August and September evenings.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: S

30 August 2013 by Christopher Somerville

S is for stick – you see them everywhere: ramblers toting walking poles, stabbing them into inoffensive meadows and flat sea walls and level country roads as though negotiating the high Himalayas.

Toad

Autumn by water

30 August 2013 by Phil Pickin

We all know autumn is a season full of rich colours on the trees and mellow fruitfulness in the hedgerows but it’s also a time during which plants and animals that live in our ponds and rivers start to get themselves ready for the coming winter.

Macrolepiota Procera

Fruits and fungi

30 August 2013 by Sheila Spence

Autumn is a great time for fruits and fungi – including one of my favourites, The Parasol.

Teal

Colourful ducks

30 August 2013 by Paul Stancliffe

During the autumn months, when their dull brown tip feathers have worn off, male ducks are at their most colourful and spectacular.

HG Wells' martian in Woking

Where the streets have no name

06 August 2013 by Walking Class Hero

Regular readers will know that I’m an enthusiastic, not to say evangelistic, urban walker who now lives deep in the heart of London’s suburbia but I find the word 'urban' a bit limiting.

Members of the Cornwall Ramblers REACT team fixing a bridge

Working for walkers

01 August 2013 by Sarah Gardner

The Ramblers knows how to work for walkers, and it knows how to have fun doing it. We recognise that we need to find our feet in a rapidly changing world, but we are as important now as we’ve ever been.

Elena Fuller, Ramblers volunteer

Hard graft and dedication

23 July 2013 by Elena Fuller

Many groups around Britain work hard to make our weekend ramble as easy as a walk in the park. One such group is the Vale Path Volunteers whose members clear footpaths in the Vale of White Horse District in Oxfordshire.

Sarah and Tegenn working with REACT to fix a bridge

A footpath a day keeps the doctor away

18 June 2013 by Sarah Gardner

It's not news to the 17,000 Ramblers volunteers who regularly give up their free time to keep paths in top condition, but getting stuck into a project like this is incredibly rewarding. Not only are you outside, feeling healthy and happy, enjoying the fresh air, you are also doing something of benefit to the wider community.

Dandelions

Golden season

01 June 2013 by Sheila Spence

We all hope for a ‘golden summer’ so here are some ‘golden’ wild foods to look out for at this time of year. Easily recognised, but usually passed by, are the golden flowers of Dandelion. The fresh young leaves can be used in salads and sandwiches, for making an herbal tonic or even fermented beer.

Grey heron

Waterway wildlife

01 June 2013 by Phil Pickin

Beyond much slower ‘traffic’ and a supply of water, the footpaths and embankments that line our canals and waterways provide green spaces – both for wildlife and walkers.

Nightjar

Summer birds

01 June 2013 by Paul Stancliffe

Some of Britain’s most iconic birds can be found during the summer months. Most arrive during the spring but are what we refer to in birding circles as summer visitors, birds like the Cuckoo, the Swallow and the Swift. However, it is not all about icons, the summer months are also the best time to see some of our most fascinating birds – birds like the Nightjar and the Woodcock.

Brian Jones

Summer stars - Draco

01 June 2013 by Brian Jones

Draco is a constellation which appeared in the star catalogues of astronomers over two thousand years ago. It depicts the dragon slain by Hercules during one of his twelve labours.

A misty Richmond Park

Walk this May

21 May 2013 by Walking Class Hero

It’s possibly the 2 bank holidays. Or it could be the 5 o’clock sunrises and the 9 o’clock sunsets that promise long, lazy walking days. Or maybe it’s because the month starts in spring and ends in summer. Whatever the reason, I reckon; all in all, May is my favourite walking month.

Steps on a historic path in Snowdonia, Wales

Oldest inscriptions on the land

15 May 2013 by Eugene Suggett

Ancient features like footpaths, and packhorse-trails, and driftways and halterways, and holloways and coffin-ways and pilgrim-ways are as much a part of our heritage as things on which we’d never now dream of setting a bulldozer such as stonehenges and castles.

Malcolm McDonnell, East Sussex Area Footpath Secretary

Unsung heroes

06 May 2013 by Elena Fuller

There is a dedicated group who give their time and energy for free all year round and excluding the odd hi-vis vest, remain unrecognisable to the general public. They are the thousands of lovely people who volunteer for the Ramblers and make our walking lives much easier.

Public footpath sign

It is solved by walking

19 April 2013 by Eugene Suggett

For decades the Ramblers have poetically spoken of the ‘refreshment of spirit’ brought about by walking, not only in remote places but indeed just about anywhere.

BRamblers and Anastasia repairing a popular path

Path guardians

02 April 2013 by Anastasia French

Physical inactivity is killing more people than smoking and getting more people walking is vital to fix this problem. Our paths are the first place people turn to go walking. Despite this, funding for our footpaths has been cut again and again.

Muddy path

Muddy work

31 March 2013 by Benedict Southworth

Last year the Ramblers helped 1200 people to safeguard their local paths, including most recently the historic Mud Lane, at Purton in Wiltshire, which had been neglected for decades.

Paul Stancliffe

Birdwatching Spring 2013

03 March 2013 by Paul Stancliffe

Spring is always an exciting time to be out and about looking for birds – and one of the best ways to enjoy birdlife is to visit distinct habitats.

Wild garlic

Wild Food Spring 2013

03 March 2013 by Sheila Spence

As Spring approaches the first sign of the impending abundance wild food is often Wild Garlic. Lime flowers are usually found later in the Spring, and can be used in soothing herbal tisanes.

Phil Pickin

Signs of spring

03 March 2013 by Phil Pickin

For many people spring is a favorite time of year - new growth gives the countryside a fresh green hue and new life evident almost everywhere you look!

Brian Jones

Spring Stars

03 March 2013 by Brian Jones

Although not particularly bright, Polaris lies in an area of sky devoid of bright stars and therefore stands out quite well.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: Q

01 March 2013 by Christopher Somerville

Q is for quicksands – The oddest place I’ve ever walked, by a country mile, is that ‘most dreadful gulfe and shippe swallower’, the Goodwin Sands.

Eugene Suggett enjoying the North Sea, Dengie Peninsula

Deceits of lapwings

20 February 2013 by Eugene Suggett

The unadorned Essex coast may lack the huge cliffs of Cape Wrath, and the dunes of Norfok or Lincolnshire. But the sights from Dengie’s uninterrupted sea wall conjure an atmosphere of their own.

Thames Path

In praise of the Thames Path

28 January 2013 by Sarah Gardner

The feel of the sun soaking through my coat is a joy I'd almost forgotten, as I make my way to Hampton Court to meet the London Strollers. This afternoon they are walking to Richmond, via Kingston, following part of the 184-miles of Thames Path.

Sheila

Seashore foraging

12 December 2012 by Sheila Spence

If you are walking by the shore this winter look out for the small shellfish locally available; cockles, mussels , winkles and the lovely long razor clams can be enjoyed throughout the winter months; they all have an ‘r’ in them.

Phil Pickin

Winter tracks

12 December 2012 by Phil Pickin

Winter can sometimes be thought of as a quiet and uninteresting time of year when it comes to wildlife, but there is more out there than you might think – it’s just a matter of knowing what to look for.

Brian Jones

Wintry skies

12 December 2012 by Brian Jones

The winter night sky contains a large number of brilliant stars, making it easier to pick out the various star patterns.

Paul Stancliffe

A Waxwing winter

12 December 2012 by Paul Stancliffe

As the weather turns colder the thoughts of many a birdwatcher turn to those birds that live to the north and east of the UK – birds from northern Scandinavia, north-western Russia and Eastern Europe.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: P

28 November 2012 by Christopher Somerville

P is for poetry – although I really ought to have filed it long ago, under ‘D is for doggerel’. Why is doggerel always seen as the poor relation of poetry?

Benedict Southworth, Pembrokeshire

Staying true to our values

19 November 2012 by Benedict Southworth

Benedict Southworth, chief executive of the Ramblers talks about the future of the organisation and how we need to be able to build on our strengths, as well as changing the things that no longer work so well, or don't work for new generations of walkers.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: O

28 August 2012 by Christopher Somerville

O is for Ooooohhhh – or the capacity to stop and stare, to be astonished, enchanted and generally struck all of a heap.

Great Church Woods, North Downs Way National Trail

A national treasure

12 August 2012 by Sarah Gardner

The North Downs Way is a good place to unwind; 153 miles of the most diverse walking habitats, included the Kent and Surrey Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). They boast swathes of chalk grassland that support wildflower, herbs and mosses and rare butterfly, such as the Adonis Blue and the Chalk-hill Blue.

Ramblers badge

If you enjoy walking thank a Rambler

30 July 2012 by Benedict Southworth

It’s hard to imagine what the world was like without the right to roam, national trails, and even rights of way on the Ordnance Survey maps. All things the Ramblers can be proud of...

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: N

23 May 2012 by Christopher Somerville

N is for Notebook – 387, 388, 389, and that’s it, till the next time I go walking. There they sit on their own special shelves, 389 of them so far – the little notebooks that have tracked my walking life over the past 30 years.

Wartime Morley College

100 not out

17 April 2012 by Walking Class Hero

There’s a lot of talk about legacy these days. A lot of us walkers love our history. Mention the Ridgeway, for example, and more often than not you’ll be told that much of the 139km/87 miles National Trail follows an ancient chalk ridge route used by prehistoric man.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: M

22 February 2012 by Christopher Somerville

M is for music – or at least what passes for it when I go walking: a constant babble of ballads, songs and snatches that trail this wand’ring minstrel like a pack of dogs.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: L

25 November 2011 by Christopher Somerville

L is for Landlady – specifically the one who ran the “K…H…” pub in “the town of M-in-T…” in “the county of D…” in the “year of Our Lord 197…”, when Dad and I set out on our first long-distance walk together, a good slice of the best bit of the Pennine Way.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: K

29 August 2011 by Christopher Somerville

K is Kyrgystan – Katboschfontein, Khatyngnakh, Kyrksæterøra, and all the other places I’ll never actually walk. They beckon from the index of my 1990 Times Atlas of the World, a constant resource and secret delight.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A Z of walking: J

01 June 2011 by Christopher Somerville

J is for Jollity – you know, that thing we associate with walking. Don’t we, lads and lasses?

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A Z of walking: I

12 April 2011 by Christopher Somerville

I is for Islands – more specifically those gloopy, gluey, marsh-and-mud islands of the Essex coast.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A Z of walking: H

22 November 2010 by Christopher Somerville

H is for Heroes - specifically Hillaby. They say you should never meet your heroes, and I never did catch up with John Hillaby. He was too busy walking.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A Z of walking: G

26 August 2010 by Christopher Somerville

My 10-year-old self lay back on the turf, book in hand, all alone in deepest Dorset. And I’ll never forget the cold pang of terror when I looked up from my book to see an evil little face, with goat-like eyes and the most cynical of smiles, staring out at me from among the tree trunks.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: F

01 June 2010 by Christopher Somerville

F is for Flora and Fauna – my favourite outdoor twins. I’ve been going out with both of them for a long time now.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: E

12 February 2010 by Christopher Somerville

E is for Elephant – and in particular the mighty Maharaja, who decided to assert his right to roam in famous circumstances.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: D

23 November 2009 by Christopher Somerville

D is for Drovers — the hard men who once travelled the green roads of our land. Everywhere you follow the ancient tracks, through holloways in the south country downs or out along cobbled paths across the northern moors, you find signs of a vigorous commerce now vanished.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: C

25 August 2009 by Christopher Somerville

C is for Company Curmudgeon Man – I hear his crusty footfall, coming nearer all the time. Share my water bottle? Well, why the bloody hell didn’t you bring your own? Do you good to go without. Teach you a lesson, won’t it?

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: B

26 May 2009 by Christopher Somerville

B is for Binoculars – a bird-watcher’s best friend, but also a walker’s. Why didn’t I think of them before? How many person-hours have I spent peering under my hand like a silly old seadog, trying to identify the minuscule blob of a waymark across a misty moor?

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: A

18 February 2009 by Christopher Somerville

A is for Anger – that healthy and yet thoroughly scary emotion. At least, we are told it is healthy. Let off steam at your workmates, exhorts the industrial psychologist. Go on, it’s good to clear the air.