Paths, parks and countryside areas

Wye

  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Kent

The reserve is renowned for its views over the Romney Marsh and Weald, and out to the Channel coast. The site is also widely known for landscape features such as the Devil's Kneading Trough, a dry, steep-sided valley formed by peri-glacial action near the end of the last ice age, and for being home to many orchid species.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

Wyre Forest

  • Distance or area: 549 hectares
  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Worcestershire

The reserve overlies a plateau containing shales and sandstones of the Upper Carboniferous Coal Measures. The area is heavily faulted, giving rise to steep valleys. Wyre Forest has elements of both lowland and upland woodland and also contains a number of unimproved grassland meadows. Old orchards and areas of scrub also contribute to the variety of habitats present in the reserve.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

Ainsdale Sand Dunes

  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Merseyside

The reserve is one of the most important wildlife sites in England, and a place where visitors can get close to nature. The landscape is perfect for a leisurely stroll through the magnificent scenery of dunes, pinewoods and golden sands, while children can enjoy the wide open spaces of the huge sandy beaches.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

Westleton Heath

  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Suffolk

In medieval times a large area of heath known as the Sandlings (on account of its dry sandy soils) stretched along the Suffolk coast. Today only about 20% of the heathland remains, the rest has been lost to modern farming and forestry.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

Scoska Wood

  • Distance or area: 10 hectares
  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: North Yorkshire

Scoska Wood NNR is a strip of ash woodland and pasture on the slopes of Littondale - the valley of the River Skirfare - between the villages of Litton and Arncliffe. The underlying Carboniferous Limestone has had a major influence on the reserve's plant life. Woodland clings to the limestone scars and rocky slopes and merges into herb-rich neutral pasture below.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk