Blogs

Hill-bagging: Know your lists

26 November 2020 by Phoebe Smith

Can’t tell your Grahams from your Donalds? Muddling your Munros and your Marilyns? If you’re perplexed by the excessive classifications of Britain’s peaks and hills then walk this way to become an instant expert…

An older woman, standing by a gate, smiling

Walking Class Heroes – Kate Ashbrook

26 November 2020 by Roly Smith

A life-long campaigner for public paths and open spaces and a firm fixture at the Ramblers, Kate Ashbrook was particularly active in seeing the CROW Bill through Parliament. This is the second excerpt from the new book Walking Class Heroes, in which the lives of 20 pioneers of the Right to Roam are examined.

Two people opening a gate that leads to a view of mountains and snow

The Battle for the Cambrian Way

27 November 2019 by Richard Tyler

The 298-mile/480km Cambrian Way from Cardiff to Conway through the spine of Wales, was devised by long-time Ramblers stalwart Tony Drake MBE who encountered considerable and enduring opposition for it to gain official recognition. It is a story that is almost as exciting as the trail itself.

A hill top, with a path winding up between the ferns and a stone wall

What does the Glover review mean for walkers?

20 October 2019 by Alison Hallas

The final report of the government’s independent review of protected landscapes, landed at the end of September to wide acclaim. It’s full of ambition for how our National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (collectively called the ‘National Landscapes’ in the report) can meet our needs in the 21st century.

Person standing on a mountain top beneath the milky way

The future of National Parks

12 September 2019 by Andrew Hall

Andrew Hall, Campaigns and Communications Officer at Campaign for National Parks takes a look at what the future might hold for National Parks

Black and white photo of four women walking in dresses and hats.

The WI celebrates the 70th anniversary of the 1949 National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act

12 September 2019 by Fiona Hughes

The WI is proud to be celebrating the 70th anniversary of the 1949 National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act. Encouraging people to walk and make the most of the beautiful green spaces across the UK will have endless benefits, from personal health and wellbeing, to reducing social isolation, something that is at the very heart of the WI’s ethos.

The Slate Trail in Snowdonia

Sole searching on the Slate Trail

19 August 2019 by Paula Renzel

We hear about Paula's challenges of overcoming the fear on her first solo long-distance hike, 5-6 days along the Snowdonia Slate Trail in North Wales.

Adults and children, around a pile of large rocks, waving

Introducing a younger audience to rambling on Dartmoor

26 July 2019 by Tessa Smith

Engaging pupils and families from White Rock Primary School with a walk on Dartmoor.

Four people walking down a path that winds between low hills

What's in a landscape?

30 November 2018 by Alison Hallas

Alison Hallas, Ramblers policy officer, looks back at the history of our involvement with National Parks, and our current work supporting a new review into the future of protected landscapes

Reaching the North Pole

Arctic adventure

24 August 2018 by Misba Khan

From weekend walker to North Pole adventurer. For Misba Khan from Manchester, joining a Ramblers group was the start of an incredible journey that led her all the way to the Arctic.

A map

Act now to protect our paths

24 August 2018 by Jack Cornish

We are blessed in England and Wales with a fantastic network of paths – nearly 140,000 miles of rights of way (enough to stretch round the earth five times or half way to the moon!). However, there are thousands of historical rights of way which have not been recorded and if they are not claimed by 2026 they will be lost – forever!

Action Beach Boy

Imagined coast

24 August 2018 by Matthew Jones

Summer is the perfect time to enjoy evocative coastal walks – from the romance and excitement of hidden coves and secret beaches to the nostalgic sights of the traditional British seaside

Canals

Walking the waterways

24 August 2018 by Phil Pickin

I'm a firm believer in not overlooking the things that are, quite possibly, right under your nose. So I was pleased when, in a highly publicised rebranding, the Canals and Rivers Trust (CRT) decided to reaffirm that the waterways are relevant to everyone.

Planning a weekend away

25 May 2018 by Steve Rawlins

Whether you go with friends, family or a walking group, heading off to the hills for a weekend away can create great memories. But the secret to success is all in the planning…

Burnbank fell for blog

I have a few problems – but they're not what you might think

30 May 2017 by Simon Barnett

Imagine the scene: you’ve walked for nearly 200 miles, climbed fell after fell and your body is tired. Oh so tired. And then you hit a problem...

Mount Everest

What’s your personal Everest?

18 May 2017 by Simon Barnett

What makes us take on crazy challenges? I'm about to climb 214 fells in a fortnight or so - what's your personal Everest?

Simon in a valley

Why I’ve decided to walk 214 fells in 15 days

26 April 2017 by Simon Barnett

This spring, I’m going to attempt to climb all the 214 Wainwright fells in one continuous route - as a holiday.

Scottish views and vistas

Manifesto for a walking Scotland

08 April 2016 by Helen Todd

As part of the 2016 Scottish Elections, there is a crying need for politicians to support walking & access, promote health, and protect the environment.

Pumlumon, Central Wales

Benedict Southworth: All paths lead to roam

16 September 2014 by Benedict Southworth

80 years ago, people wanting to escape the city and climb mountains, or explore wild moorland risked threats, harassment, and even arrest. Now, all open country (mountains, moor, heath, down and common land) in England and Wales is open for us to roam freely. In Scotland, you can walk (and camp) almost anywhere.

Cairngorms National Park

Helen Todd: The Scottish referendum and walking

10 September 2014 by Helen Todd

With the referendum on Scottish independence imminent, we re-post an original blog from Ramblers Scotland campaigner Helen on the impacts a yes vote could have on walkers.

Butterfly on plant

What is the value of nature?

12 March 2014 by Kate Conto

Can we ever place an economic value on the natural environment and everything it does for us? Shouldn’t we just look after nature because it is the right thing to do morally?

Kate Ashbrook at the kissing gate she installed at Cobstone Hill, Turville, in the Chilterns

Defending access to the outdoors

04 November 2013 by Kate Ashbrook

Kate Ashbrook talks about what inspired her to start campaigning to defend access to the outdoors and why it's as important as ever in these austere times.

Ramblers badge

If you enjoy walking thank a Rambler

30 July 2012 by Benedict Southworth

It’s hard to imagine what the world was like without the right to roam, national trails, and even rights of way on the Ordnance Survey maps. All things the Ramblers can be proud of...

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