Blogs

Cotswold Way waymarker

Cotswold Way at 50

23 August 2021 by Natalie Hoare

The Cotswold Way passed its 50th anniversary on Sunday 17 May 2020, at the height of the pandemic. Gloucestershire Ramblers are helping to organise postponed celebrations during September.

An older woman, standing by a gate, smiling

Walking Class Heroes – Kate Ashbrook

26 November 2020 by Roly Smith

A life-long campaigner for public paths and open spaces and a firm fixture at the Ramblers, Kate Ashbrook was particularly active in seeing the CROW Bill through Parliament. This is the second excerpt from the new book Walking Class Heroes, in which the lives of 20 pioneers of the Right to Roam are examined.

Two people opening a gate that leads to a view of mountains and snow

The Battle for the Cambrian Way

27 November 2019 by Richard Tyler

The 298-mile/480km Cambrian Way from Cardiff to Conway through the spine of Wales, was devised by long-time Ramblers stalwart Tony Drake MBE who encountered considerable and enduring opposition for it to gain official recognition. It is a story that is almost as exciting as the trail itself.

A hill top, with a path winding up between the ferns and a stone wall

What does the Glover review mean for walkers?

20 October 2019 by Alison Hallas

The final report of the government’s independent review of protected landscapes, landed at the end of September to wide acclaim. It’s full of ambition for how our National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (collectively called the ‘National Landscapes’ in the report) can meet our needs in the 21st century.

One person walking a long straight path in a flat field

A new European path for peace

28 May 2019 by Beth Salt

Tracing the line of the 1914-18 battle front, the Western Front Way is a proposed 725km path for peace and remembrance that runs from the Swiss border in the south, through France and Belgium to the North Sea. As the first 140km section is unveiled, Beth Salt explains how the project got off the ground.

Landscape view with hills and sheep

Pennine Journey

22 February 2019 by David Pitt

Last year was the 80th anniversary of the Pennine Journey – a lesser known route devised by Alfred Wainwright and subsequently turned into an official 247-mile circular route from Settle in North Yorkshire thanks to the efforts of two passionate long-distance walkers.

Ruth sitting on a rock looking out to sea as the sun sets

A restorative walk by the sea

28 September 2017 by Ruth Latham

As we celebrate the announcement that Natural England has started work on all stretches of the England Coast Path, Ruth reflects on how a good walk by the sea helped her and her husband through a traumatic experience.

A dog sitting on a beach with the shadows of two people stretching alongside it

Expanding coastal access in Wales

06 September 2017 by Rebecca Brough

Rebecca Brough, policy and advocacy manager for Ramblers Cymru, looks at the success of the Wales Coast Path and the opportunity this summer to extend access to coast and cliffs.

Steps down to a beach

The England Coast Past

01 September 2017 by Nicky Philpott

Nicky Philpott, director of advocacy and engagement, takes a trip down memory lane to retell the history of the England Coast Path. Find out more about how the Ramblers helped make the path a reality.

Seven Sisters South Downs

England Coast Path - the whole story

18 August 2017 by Kate Conto

Our senior policy officer Kate Conto has been involved in the England Coast Path from the start. She tells us all about the highs and lows of this inspirational project.

Botany Bay

Kent's unique coastline

11 August 2017 by Robert Peel

Our volunteer, Robert Peel, has been at the heart of the England Coast Path in Kent. He showcases the tireless work of the Kent volunteers in establishing the Kent stretch of the coast path.

Walking the English Coast

04 August 2017 by Ruth Livingstone

Ruth Livingstone, coastal walker and Ramblers member takes us through her journey round the coast and tells us why paths are so important to her.

Mount Everest

What’s your personal Everest?

18 May 2017 by Simon Barnett

What makes us take on crazy challenges? I'm about to climb 214 fells in a fortnight or so - what's your personal Everest?

Pathwatch launch week on Offa's Dyke

16 December 2016 by Pathwatch

Last month, our Pathwatch campaign launched with a week of path maintenance on Offa’s Dyke Path. Rambler’s delivery officer, Anna Brewster, rolled up her sleeves and got stuck in.

Scottish views and vistas

Manifesto for a walking Scotland

08 April 2016 by Helen Todd

As part of the 2016 Scottish Elections, there is a crying need for politicians to support walking & access, promote health, and protect the environment.

Pumlumon, Central Wales

Benedict Southworth: All paths lead to roam

16 September 2014 by Benedict Southworth

80 years ago, people wanting to escape the city and climb mountains, or explore wild moorland risked threats, harassment, and even arrest. Now, all open country (mountains, moor, heath, down and common land) in England and Wales is open for us to roam freely. In Scotland, you can walk (and camp) almost anywhere.

Butterfly on plant

What is the value of nature?

12 March 2014 by Kate Conto

Can we ever place an economic value on the natural environment and everything it does for us? Shouldn’t we just look after nature because it is the right thing to do morally?

Winter walking in a snow-clad Surrey

Winter walking

21 December 2013 by Sarah Gardner

As a child of the summer, Sarah always dreaded the long winter months. And then she discovered the magic of winter walking.

Kate Ashbrook at the kissing gate she installed at Cobstone Hill, Turville, in the Chilterns

Defending access to the outdoors

04 November 2013 by Kate Ashbrook

Kate Ashbrook talks about what inspired her to start campaigning to defend access to the outdoors and why it's as important as ever in these austere times.

Ordnance Survey maps

South to the sea - part 1

18 October 2013 by Anastasia French

Like the author Laurie Lee, Anastasia woke up one morning with the idea to walk south to the sea - and she did it! In this first instalment she has Big Ben, some Elvis Presley lookalikes and a herd of deer for company as she heads southwest along the Thames Path.

The ice-cream team

Making the case for coast

16 September 2013 by Anastasia French

A few years ago Government agreed to make a path around England’s coast – a very special path that opens up all beaches and foreshores and rolls back when nature takes over. At the time, it was hoped that we’d get that path within 10 years. 4 years on and there’s only one small stretch open.

Coastal access

Coasting along to nowhere?

02 September 2013 by Dominic Bates

Dominic Bates, editor of walk magazine, talks about the future of the England Coast Path and the challenges of keeping the magazine ahead of the game.

Thames Path

In praise of the Thames Path

28 January 2013 by Sarah Gardner

The feel of the sun soaking through my coat is a joy I'd almost forgotten, as I make my way to Hampton Court to meet the London Strollers. This afternoon they are walking to Richmond, via Kingston, following part of the 184-miles of Thames Path.

Great Church Woods, North Downs Way National Trail

A national treasure

12 August 2012 by Sarah Gardner

The North Downs Way is a good place to unwind; 153 miles of the most diverse walking habitats, included the Kent and Surrey Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). They boast swathes of chalk grassland that support wildflower, herbs and mosses and rare butterfly, such as the Adonis Blue and the Chalk-hill Blue.

Ramblers badge

If you enjoy walking thank a Rambler

30 July 2012 by Benedict Southworth

It’s hard to imagine what the world was like without the right to roam, national trails, and even rights of way on the Ordnance Survey maps. All things the Ramblers can be proud of...

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