Blogs

A map

Act now to protect our paths

24 August 2018 by Jack Cornish

We are blessed in England and Wales with a fantastic network of paths – nearly 140,000 miles of rights of way (enough to stretch round the earth five times or half way to the moon!). However, there are thousands of historical rights of way which have not been recorded and if they are not claimed by 2026 they will be lost – forever!

Action Beach Boy

Imagined coast

24 August 2018 by Matthew Jones

Summer is the perfect time to enjoy evocative coastal walks – from the romance and excitement of hidden coves and secret beaches to the nostalgic sights of the traditional British seaside

Reaching the North Pole

Arctic adventure

24 August 2018 by Guest blogger

From weekend walker to North Pole adventurer. For Misba Khan from Manchester, joining a Ramblers group was the start of an incredible journey that led her all the way to the Arctic.

Canals

Walking the waterways

24 August 2018 by Phil Pickin

I'm a firm believer in not overlooking the things that are, quite possibly, right under your nose. So I was pleased when, in a highly publicised rebranding, the Canals and Rivers Trust (CRT) decided to reaffirm that the waterways are relevant to everyone.

Planning a weekend away

25 May 2018 by Steve Rawlins

Whether you go with friends, family or a walking group, heading off to the hills for a weekend away can create great memories. But the secret to success is all in the planning…

A little mindfulness never hurt anyone

25 May 2018 by Phil Pickin

For those of us who enjoy the countryside, it will come as no surprise that increasing numbers of people have acknowledged a direct link between access to nature and good mental health.

Jerry Pearlman: lawyer who fought for our rights

20 March 2018 by Kate Ashbrook

Kate Ashbrook reflects on Jerry Pearlman - an honorary solicitor for the Ramblers for more than 30 years, taking on countless path battles and campaigneing for freedom to roam on open country.

Natural neighbourhoods

06 March 2018 by Kate Conto

Parks in towns and cities are the way that most of us engage with and benefit from contact with the natural environment. It is therefore vital that the Government’s 25 year plan to improve the environment must include ambitions for urban settings.

A walk through the next 25 years

06 February 2018 by Alison Hallas

Following the launch of the Government's long-awaited 25 Year Environment Plan, our policy officer, Alison Hallas, looks at what the plan actually offers to those of us who love walking.

The benefits of access land

18 January 2018 by Guest blogger

Alan Marlow, the Ramblers Hampshire area footpath and access officer, shares his views on why open access is important.

For peat’s sake

12 January 2018 by Phil Pickin

Peatlands alleviate flooding, store carbon and are home to a range of wildlife. Phil Pickin discusses the restoration of these areas and best places to walk.

Winter Walks

08 December 2017 by Matthew Jones

Editor of walk, Matt Jones, on why he loves a Boxing Day stroll and is determined to make the most of the colder months this winter.

Columba: A Celestial Dove Flying Through the Winter Skies

24 November 2017 by Brian Jones

Ramblers’ resident stargazer Brian Jones gives us reasons to head outside and check out the night sky. This winter we cast our gaze upwards and seek out the celestial dove Columba.

Small but special

06 October 2017 by Brian Jones

Ramblers’ resident stargazer Brian Jones gives us reasons to head outside and check out the night sky. For autumn, we turn our attention to the tiny constellation Equuleus.

Ruth sitting on a rock looking out to sea as the sun sets

A restorative walk by the sea

28 September 2017 by Ruth Latham

As we celebrate the announcement that Natural England has started work on all stretches of the England Coast Path, Ruth reflects on how a good walk by the sea helped her and her husband through a traumatic experience.

Turnstone

Life's a beach

08 September 2017 by Paul Stancliffe

As the days shorten and temperatures fall, our beaches come into their own for birds. Who says Britain’s beaches are just for the summer?

A dog sitting on a beach with the shadows of two people stretching alongside it

Expanding coastal access in Wales

06 September 2017 by Rebecca Brough

Rebecca Brough, policy and advocacy manager for Ramblers Cymru, looks at the success of the Wales Coast Path and the opportunity this summer to extend access to coast and cliffs.

Steps down to a beach

The England Coast Past

01 September 2017 by Nicky Philpott

Nicky Philpott, director of advocacy and engagement, takes a trip down memory lane to retell the history of the England Coast Path. Find out more about how the Ramblers helped make the path a reality.

Blackberries

Thorny Issues

25 August 2017 by Phil Pickin

Journalist and photographer Phil Pickin discusses the downsides and redeeming qualities of the humble bramble.

Seven Sisters South Downs

England Coast Path - the whole story

18 August 2017 by Kate Conto

Our senior policy officer Kate Conto has been involved in the England Coast Path from the start. She tells us all about the highs and lows of this inspirational project.

Corona Australis graphic

Crowning glory

27 July 2017 by Brian Jones

Ramblers’ resident stargazer Brian Jones gives us reasons to head outside and check out the night sky. This summer we look at the southern crown, know as Corona Australis.

Flooded path

Protecting precious landscapes in the face of climate change

01 July 2017 by Alison Hallas

We are regularly out walking in our favourite places and can see first-hand the impact of a changing climate. We join with other environmental charities to press for greater protection for our habitats, air and water, to make our environment better able to withstand the effects of climate change

Seeing spots

14 June 2017 by Paul Stancliffe

With the breeding season in full swing, young birds can often be spotted in our gardens and countryside, often accompanied by their parents – though you may not always be able to tell.

Burnbank fell for blog

I have a few problems – but they're not what you might think

30 May 2017 by Simon Barnett

Imagine the scene: you’ve walked for nearly 200 miles, climbed fell after fell and your body is tired. Oh so tired. And then you hit a problem...

Wild and free

25 May 2017 by Phil Pickin

Although they’ve been out and about since spring, it’s during the summer months that we notice the butterflies.

Mount Everest

What’s your personal Everest?

18 May 2017 by Simon Barnett

What makes us take on crazy challenges? I'm about to climb 214 fells in a fortnight or so - what's your personal Everest?

Steve's route

A history of the Wainwrights & some 214 record-breakers

08 May 2017 by Simon Barnett

Simon - who is attempting to climb all 214 Wainwrights in 15 days - runs through how the Wainwrights got their name and some of the record attempts in the Lakes.

Local elections 2017: Making the case for outdoor recreation

27 April 2017 by Helen Todd

With the 2017 local elections looming in Scotland, Helen Todd says it's vital that outdoor interests engage with local democracy.

Simon in a valley

Why I’ve decided to walk 214 fells in 15 days

26 April 2017 by Simon Barnett

This spring, I’m going to attempt to climb all the 214 Wainwright fells in one continuous route - as a holiday.

Bright and beautiful

13 April 2017 by Paul Stancliffe

When the days finally lengthen and the warmth of the sun can be felt breathing new life into the countryside, our birds suddenly spring into life. Our birdwatching expert, Paul Stancliffe, discusses the wonderful colours of breeding birds this spring.

Crux map

A distinctive Cross in the southern sky

30 March 2017 by Brian Jones

Although Crux (the Cross) is the smallest in area of all the constellations, it is also one of the most famous. It is depicted on the flags of countries like Australia and New Zealand, and found on many postage stamps as well as on coins, banknotes and innumerable paintings.

Bluebell

Nothing says ‘spring’ like flowers

24 February 2017 by Phil Pickin

With the hours of daylight lengthening and the weather turning just that little bit warmer, it can only mean one thing – spring is on its way.

Eridanus blog on the night sky

Follow the river

31 January 2017 by Brian Jones

Brian Jones takes a look at the night sky this winter. Happy stargazing!

A spiced parsnip cake, freshly cut

Cold comfort recipes

18 January 2017 by Charlotte Pike

Warming and sustaining recipes from Award-winning food writer Charlotte Pike for the winter.

Jump

Get Happy

01 January 2017 by Walking Class Hero

The best way to satisfy ‘the urge to affiliate with other forms of life’ is to go for a good walk.

Have a wild winter

Have a wild winter

05 December 2016 by Phil Pickin

Although it may not be the best weather for getting out and about, cold, crisp days are a great time to get outside. What could be better than a frost-covered landscape seen against a clear blue sky?

Bird of a feather 1 by Jill Pakenham

Birds of a feather flock together

25 November 2016 by Paul Stancliffe

Winter is coming. Paul Stancliffe looks at our wild birds and how they spend the cold months in search of food and company.

Natural order

06 October 2016 by Phil Pickin

Phil Pickin looks at climate change and its effects on nature.

Time to leave

22 September 2016 by Paul Stancliffe

Paul Stancliffe takes a look at our autumn birds.

Celestial fishing

09 September 2016 by Brian Jones

As autumn gets into full swing, Brian Jones takes a look at the night sky...

A Bullet from a Shooting Star by Alex Chinneck

I walk the line

22 July 2016 by Walking Class Hero

You’ll have probably have heard of the New York High Line. Walking Class Hero explores the walk and other urban, linear, high line parks in Paris, London and Manchester.

White Cliffs Walking festival 2016

Have you tried a walking festival near you?

12 July 2016 by Ash Stally Chudasama

Summer is here, and so begins festival season! Festivals are a great way to experience the best of what Britain has to offer – whether it’s music, food, ale or walking.

Walking for Health in Bowling Park

Physical inactivity is killing us - let's find our feet

01 July 2016 by Roberta Antonaci

Physical inactivity is killing us, with a lack of exercise now causing 1 in 6 deaths in the UK. Fortunately there is an answer, and it lies at your feet.

Looking over to Craig Wen and Craig Lwyd

Go wild outdoors

06 June 2016 by Phil Pickin

Phil Pickin tells us why we should be going wild over the summer months – even if it’s only in our back garden

Scottish views and vistas

Manifesto for a walking Scotland

08 April 2016 by Helen Todd

As part of the 2016 Scottish Elections, there is a crying need for politicians to support walking & access, promote health, and protect the environment.

andromeda thumbnail

Brian Jones hones in on a celestial showpiece

09 December 2015 by Brian Jones

Celebrating the winter months with a celestial showpiece, Brian Jones explains how to see Andromeda and her galaxy…

black mustard

Adventures in foraging

05 October 2015 by Dumisani Nyathi

A young forager talks about how he got started finding food along the paths near his home.

aonoch eagrach thumnail

The Munros and the joy of bagging

18 September 2015 by Helen Todd

Helen Todd explores her passion for bagging in the mountains of Scotland

Roasted vegetables with miso sauce

Charlotte Pike's recipe for roasted vegetables with miso sauce

26 August 2015 by Charlotte Pike

Food writer Charlotte Pike is celebrating the launch of her new book, Fermented, so she’s sharing her recipe for roasted vegetables with miso sauce with walk readers. It’s the perfect seasonal warmer after a good day’s walking…

ally mac noodles

Ally Mac's recipe for courgette noodles

19 May 2015 by Ally Mac

Taking the best of our British crops and a little foraging, food blogger Ally Mac turns them into something light and healthy to enjoy after those walks in the summer sun

Mole above ground

Phil Pickin: Discover the wildlife right under your feet

12 May 2015 by Phil Pickin

Wildlife expert Phil Pickin urges us all to take note of the wildlife that’s right under our feet.

woodpecker

Paul Stancliffe on exploring woodlands this summer

28 April 2015 by Paul Stancliffe

As summer gets into full swing, Paul Stancliffe tells us why it’s the perfect time of year for birdwatching in Britain’s beautiful and abundant woodland

Sextan

Brian Jones: what to look for in April’s night sky

21 April 2015 by Brian Jones

Walk’s resident stargazer Brian Jones introduces us to the constellation of Sextans (the sextant), which is most visible in April

Walking shoes

Z.W. Bates: because I walked

17 March 2015 by Guest blogger

Whether Saint Augustine said it first or he repeated what he had overheard elsewhere, it is true, things can be solved by walking.

Taurus

Brian Jones: all about Taurus

27 February 2015 by Brian Jones

Ramblers’ resident stargazer Brian Jones gives us reasons to head outside and check out the night sky, as well as a sneak peak at the details of his new book on stargazing

Snow covered mountains

Beth Pipe: winter picnics

20 January 2015 by Beth Pipe

Clear blue skies mean perfect picnics, regardless of whether it’s the middle of summer or winter.

East Loch Lomond sign

Helen Todd: camping in Scotland - to ban, or not to ban

22 December 2014 by Helen Todd

Campaign manager for Ramblers Scotland discusses the impact of camping bans in Scotland.

Yelha

Paul Stancliffe: Enjoy winter's bird bounty

28 November 2014 by Paul Stancliffe

Paul Stancliffe from the British Trust for Ornithology talks about changing birdlife to look out for in the UK in autumn

Funghi

Sheila Spence: winter foraging and Chinese 'ear' soup...

25 November 2014 by Sheila Spence

berries

Phil Pickin: And you thought autumn was a quiet time of the year?

12 November 2014 by Phil Pickin

One of the most impressive times of the year, regular blogger, Phil Pickin explains why autumn is active, interesting, and seriously colourful

World War One

Mark Rowe: keeping the memory of Flanders Fields alive

11 November 2014 by Mark Rowe

Mark walks the battlefields of Flanders, outside Ypres, and wonders how long the land will remain sacrosanct in perpetuity - and what role footpaths might play in keeping World War One in our collective memory.

Pisces constellation

Brian Jones sees heavenly fishes in the autumn sky

30 October 2014 by Brian Jones

Providing a sky-high reason to wrap up warm this winter and head outdoors, Brian Jones tells us how to spot Pisces

Walking Class Hero looking out to sea

Walking Class Hero: standing in the breach

22 October 2014 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero visits the Medmerry to see an innovative project by the Environment Agency to reduce flooding, offer a home for wildlife, and increase access for walkers and cyclists.

Mount Fuji

Kate Ashbrook: tragedy on Mount Ontake

03 October 2014 by Kate Ashbrook

We were sad to hear of the hikers who were injured or killed by the Mount Ontake volcano. Our President Kate Ashbrook, who has visited Japan to talk about our path network, shares her thoughts on the role walking plays in Japanese culture.

Pumlumon, Central Wales

Benedict Southworth: All paths lead to roam

16 September 2014 by Benedict Southworth

80 years ago, people wanting to escape the city and climb mountains, or explore wild moorland risked threats, harassment, and even arrest. Now, all open country (mountains, moor, heath, down and common land) in England and Wales is open for us to roam freely. In Scotland, you can walk (and camp) almost anywhere.

Isle of Mull

Ed Wilson: What’s the story in Balamory?

12 September 2014 by Ed Wilson

Ed visits the Isle of Mull and considers the valuable contribution volunteers make to society.

Cairngorms National Park

Helen Todd: The Scottish referendum and walking

10 September 2014 by Helen Todd

With the referendum on Scottish independence imminent, we re-post an original blog from Ramblers Scotland campaigner Helen on the impacts a yes vote could have on walkers.

Wood cauliflower

Sheila Spence talks autumn recipes and foraging

08 September 2014 by Sheila Spence

Sheila Spence goes autumn foraging and shares her recipe for wood cauliflower pieces.

Fieldfare - John Harding/BTO

Paul Stancliffe looks forward to this year’s autumn bird migration

02 September 2014 by Paul Stancliffe

From the British Trust of Ornithology, Paul Stancliffe explains how to enjoy the migration season this autumn!

Dom abseiling in the Cairngorms

Dominic Bates: Mountain scrambling in the Cairngorms

29 August 2014 by Dominic Bates

Dominic Bates tries his hand (and feet) at scrambling and wonders if this is the start of his transformation from jelly-legged to celebrated mountaineer...

Anastasia taking a break at Kinder Scout

Anastasia French: my top 5 reasons for walking

20 August 2014 by Anastasia French

When Ana injured her knee, she discovered how vital walking was to her physical and mental wellbeing. It wasn't just rambles that were out of the question, but socialising, her independence and her freedom. These are her top 5 reasons why walking is wonderful.

Salisbury Plain

Walking Class Hero: the rule of Snot

15 August 2014 by Walking Class Hero

What does a Saxon chief called Snot, Gotham City and Dolly Parton have in common? Another walk with resident blogger Walking Class Hero of course. This month, the urban delights of Nottingham.

Summer star constellations

The stars of the summer - Brian Jones explains

28 July 2014 by Brian Jones

We all hope for blue skies in the summer, but at night time the heavens can be equally spectacular as Brian Jones explains

Fox Illustration - Bonnie Friend

Nightlife: Phil Pickin talks about wildlife after dark

16 July 2014 by Phil Pickin

From wary badgers to majestic deer, campaigner and avid walker, Phil Pickin, talks about nocturnal wildlife and how to spot it - if you’re lucky!

Loughrigg Fell

Mark Rowe: Mortal man

14 July 2014 by Mark Rowe

Mark Rowe on how he - or more accurately his wife and her lifelong cuddly penguin - survived an unexpected adventure in the Lake District.

Group walk in summer

Parks and urban green space: back to the 80s?

26 June 2014 by Tom Fewins

A city’s parks and open spaces are often referred to as its ‘green lungs’, however new research published today by The Heritage Lottery Fund suggests those lungs are in serious danger of running out of air.

Chris Grogan walking away from Dentdale

I'll take the high way

16 June 2014 by Chris Grogan

"It started out as a game. Something my husband and I played when we were out walking together." Chris Grogan on how and why she and her husband created the long-distance route A Dales Way in Yorkshire.

Ben Bheoil

Time for an adventure!

10 June 2014 by Helen Todd

To go into the outdoors is to challenge yourself and leave behind the trappings of your comfortable, daily routine. Helen's latest blog is on how to enjoy planned adventures and survuve unintended ones!

Path maintenance volunteers

It's time to say thank you

02 June 2014 by Ed Wilson

It's Volunteers Week and we want to take a minute to stop and say thank you. Thank you for giving your time, skills and energy to the Ramblers and ensuring we can do what we do.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: V

29 May 2014 by Christopher Somerville

V is for vixen, specifically the very beautiful animal who came at me out of a moonlit cornfield.

Wasp

Ouch!

28 May 2014 by Phil Pickin

Although the summer weather encourages wildlife to get evermore active, some of these active members of the natural world are less welcome than others.

Black Guillemot

Seaside visitors

27 May 2014 by Paul Stancliffe

From rare gulls to speeding Peregrines, Walk's resident birdwatcher takes a tour around the entire UK coastline – revealing what birds to look for this summer, and where best to spot them.

Wild Garlic

Fresh growth

26 May 2014 by Sheila Spence

Early summer provides a wealth of young leaves and fungi, in particular the easily recognised Giant Puffball, golden Apricot smelling Girolles and bright yellow Chicken of the Woods to name but a few.

Walking Class Hero at the Sarah Records themed walks in Bristol

Maritime city

23 May 2014 by Walking Class Hero

For Get Walking Week, our very own award-winning Walking Class Hero joined "Between Hello and Goodbye: The Secret World of Sarah Records" themed walks around Bristol.

Dundee group taking a break from BBC filming

Trust me I'm a doctor

08 May 2014 by Moira Dobson

Moira Dobson, from the Dundee Ramblers, talks about her group's experience of taking part in an episode of the BBC series of 'Trust Me I'm a Doctor'.

St Agnes viaduct, Cornwall

To the land's end

06 May 2014 by Sarah Gardner

At the land's end, a newly opened path that "climbs through tranquil woodland, with bluebell and wild garlic, and crosses a gentle stream full of the sounds of cascading water to take in a disused viaduct, home to curling ivy and nesting wild bees".

Walking near cows, Wyredale Way, Lancashire. Credit to Ian Dickin

Walking near cows: keep calm and carry on

01 May 2014 by Dominic Bates

Dominic Bates, editor of Walk Magazine, 'fesses up to his fear of cattle and following some advice from a beef farmer learns how to walk near cows with confidence.

Eugene Suggett with Scarborough Ramblers and Robert Goodwill MP

Transported to Turkey Carpet

28 April 2014 by Eugene Suggett

Eugene joins Scarborough Ramblers and Robert Goodwill MP for a walk through Hilda Wood, near Hackness to enjoy the ramsons and to "air a few issues of national importance".

St Pancras Old Church

Myths and legacy

24 April 2014 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero explores Kings Cross and discovers how old and new sit alongside one another with tales of the Iceni, Harry Potter, the Beatles and the cross itself.

River Lee

I can't remember colours...

18 April 2014 by Julie Dexter

Julie Dexter on her first time volunteering as a blind guide with the Capital Walkers and the London Blind Rambling Club. Walking with the inspirational and poetic Mafoud, she explores the Lee Navigation.

Brian Jones

The celestial lion and her cub

16 April 2014 by Brian Jones

The distinctive shape of Leo is unmistakeable – it is one of the few groups actually resembling the object or character that it depicts, in this case the Nemean lion which Hercules slew as the first of his twelve labours.

European Ramblers enjoying a walk

Common ground in Copenhagen

14 April 2014 by Helen Todd

Helen Todd takes a trip to Copenhagen to talk walking (and cycling) with the European Ramblers' Association.

Gloucestershire

The good life

10 April 2014 by Emma Bovill

We spend a lot more time looking at our local Ordnance Survey map (Explorer OL45) these days... we’re concentrating on just a few folds at the moment but there’s plenty of time to fan out further as we dip our toes deeper into country life in the Cotswolds.

Mars

Red planet rising

09 April 2014 by Brian Jones

The Red Planet has returned! Every couple of years, Mars is particularly well placed in the evening sky as it reaches the point in its orbit around the Sun. Walk's resident Starman takes a look at this enigmatic planet.

Solihull Bramblers: Spencer and Les

Bramblers to the rescue!

04 April 2014 by Adam Pearce

Volunteer Adam Pearce talks about how he helps keep the local path network open, by clearing paths and installing gates with the Solihull Bramblers.

South Cotswolds Ramblers walking near the set of BBC's Larkrise to Candleford, Oxfordshire

A living museum

20 March 2014 by Ed Wilson

Historic paths are like a living museum, but their stories keep growing and changing as more feet pass over them. Ed ponder the importance of historic paths and the the footpath that links the real Larkrise to Candleford, in Oxfordshire.

Butterfly on plant

What is the value of nature?

12 March 2014 by Kate Conto

Can we ever place an economic value on the natural environment and everything it does for us? Shouldn’t we just look after nature because it is the right thing to do morally?

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: U

28 February 2014 by Christopher Somerville

U is for Umbrella, that quintessentially British piece of outdoor equipment – characterful, stoical, faintly but unmistakeably laughable.

Paul Stancliffe

Top five birds to see this spring

27 February 2014 by Paul Stancliffe

Spring is always an exciting time for birdwatchers, as some of our most iconic birds return after spending the long winter months in Africa. Here are five birds to watch out for this season.

Shiela Spence

Gather spring mushrooms and morels – even in urban areas

26 February 2014 by Sheila Spence

As the days get longer and hopefully warmer we look to the woodlands for the delights of wild fungi to tempt our taste buds.

Phil Pickin

Citizen science

25 February 2014 by Phil Pickin

Carrying out research when you are out walking may not be everyone's idea of fun. But for those who do it, it can make a trip into the outdoors even more interesting and can provide research organisations with much needed and very valuable data.

Brian Jones

Canis Major

24 February 2014 by Brian Jones

Brilliant Capella is the leading star in the constellation Auriga, the Charioteer, a conspicuous group which resembles a large circlet of stars.

Helen at A'Bhuidheanach Beag

Winter walking gear

21 February 2014 by Helen Todd

Helen on how to survive walking the hills in winter with the right planning, equipment and of course spare pockets filled with bags of nuts, chocolate and flapjack bars!

"Uh-oh. There's a couple coming - what do I say?"

The etiquette of hello

07 February 2014 by Mark Rowe

Mark Rowe considers the etiquette of saying 'hello' when exploring the great outdoors. Who should you greet while wandering lonely as the proverbial?

Je Thames plaque

Estuary english

05 February 2014 by Walking Class Hero

Walking Class Hero meditates on the transitional nature of estuaries by visiting Burnham-on-Crouch, on a gunmetal grey overcast day.

The Boy, aka Alfie the dog

Mysterious mills and marshes

03 February 2014 by Chris Woodley-Stewart

In the third of a series of blogs on walking in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Chris Woodley-Stewart and The Boy (Alfie the Collie) explore the wild Suffolk Coast at the turning of the year.

Ana enjoyed a game of pooh sticks

South to the sea - 100 akers of fun

13 January 2014 by Anastasia French

Like the author Laurie Lee, Anastasia woke up one morning with a desire to walk south to the sea. In her fifth installment she is walking through the 100 Aker Wood.

Pedestrians do not frack!

South to the Sea part 4 – fracking around

17 December 2013 by Anastasia French

Like the author Laurie Lee, Anastasia woke up one morning with a desire to walk south to the sea. In her fourth installment she is joined by her dad, her best friend and someone called Chick who used to know Aung San Suu Kyi, as she attempts to see some fracking.

Paul Stancliffe

The great goose winter spectacular

03 December 2013 by Paul Stancliffe

During the winter months Britain and Ireland are among the best places in the world to spot wild geese – and getting to grips with them also offers plenty of opportunities to enjoy some spectacular walks.

Phil Pickin

Restoring our precious peatlands

02 December 2013 by Phil Pickin

Despite the fact that peatland can seem featureless and rather flat, it provides us with a number of vital services: storing carbon, mitigating flooding and providing precious habitat for a range of plants and animals.

Brian Jones

The great comet

28 November 2013 by Brian Jones

Comet ISON is what astronomers class as a sungrazing comet. The moment of closest approach to the Sun of any object orbiting it is known as the perihelion, sungrazers being a class of comet that pass extremely close to the Sun. Comet ISON passes perihelion tonight – at which point it will approach to around 1,160,000 kilometres (730,000 miles) of the solar surface.

Christopher Somerville

Christopher Somerville's A-Z of walking: T

27 November 2013 by Christopher Somerville

T is for Thermos – and thermals, too, and thin layers, and thick overtrousers, and all the other stuff my dad would never have dreamed of taking with him on a winter walk.

Shiela Spence

Wintery wild food

26 November 2013 by Sheila Spence

Even as the winter chill sets in there are still plenty of wild foods to search out and enjoy. Walk Magazine's resident forager reveals what to look for this season.

Horton Country Park

South to the sea part 2 - starting out solo

29 October 2013 by Anastasia French

Like the author Laurie Lee, Anastasia woke up one morning with a desire to walk south to the sea - and she did it! In the second instalment she starts out solo and find it less of a walk in the park...

Walking with Simon Armitage at Westward Ho!

Westward Ho!

24 October 2013 by Walking Class Hero

I was in North Devon to join the poet Simon Armitage and walk a stretch of the South West Coast Path. A couple of years ago I accompanied Simon on a section of the Pennine Way for his book Walking Home, this year he’s writing the follow-up, imaginatively entitled Walking Away.

Emma at the Isle of Wight

Britain's best view?

03 October 2013 by Emma Bovill

What makes up a great view? The effort it takes to walk to a viewpoint or the unexpectedness of what you find? Or does a great view have something you simply can't explain?

Bath skyline

Summer lovin'

24 September 2013 by Walking Class Hero

Whilst we look forward to autumn with early fogs and a hint of crisp in the air, Walking Class Hero is reminiscing about the wonderful summer of walking. But what would have made it even better?

Botany Bay, Thanet Coastal Path

Unexpected remoteness

19 September 2013 by Eugene Suggett

The sandy beaches and inlets and caves make Botany Bay an attraction ... the awesome sea-stacks, fashioned over time from the chalk cliffs by the waves, give it the type of desolate eeriness not normally expected.

Walkers in Weardale, credit Simon Wilson

The roof of England

13 September 2013 by Chris Woodley-Stewart

As the Director of the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Chris Woodley-Stewart is a lucky man. He works in the "true north" where Cumbria, Northumberland and County Durham meet. Find out more about walking in what he calls a "wild and wonderful place".

Brian Jones

The Fox

30 August 2013 by Brian Jones

The constellation of Vulpecula (The Fox) is small and relatively faint, but ideally placed for viewing during August and September evenings.

Toad

Autumn by water

30 August 2013 by Phil Pickin

We all know autumn is a season full of rich colours on the trees and mellow fruitfulness in the hedgerows but it’s also a time during which plants and animals that live in our ponds and rivers start to get themselves ready for the coming winter.

Macrolepiota Procera

Fruits and fungi

30 August 2013 by Sheila Spence

Autumn is a great time for fruits and fungi – including one of my favourites, The Parasol.

Teal

Colourful ducks

30 August 2013 by Paul Stancliffe

During the autumn months, when their dull brown tip feathers have worn off, male ducks are at their most colourful and spectacular.

HG Wells' martian in Woking

Where the streets have no name

06 August 2013 by Walking Class Hero

Regular readers will know that I’m an enthusiastic, not to say evangelistic, urban walker who now lives deep in the heart of London’s suburbia but I find the word 'urban' a bit limiting.

Dandelions

Golden season

01 June 2013 by Sheila Spence

We all hope for a ‘golden summer’ so here are some ‘golden’ wild foods to look out for at this time of year. Easily recognised, but usually passed by, are the golden flowers of Dandelion. The fresh young leaves can be used in salads and sandwiches, for making an herbal tonic or even fermented beer.

Grey heron

Waterway wildlife

01 June 2013 by Phil Pickin

Beyond much slower ‘traffic’ and a supply of water, the footpaths and embankments that line our canals and waterways provide green spaces – both for wildlife and walkers.

Nightjar

Summer birds

01 June 2013 by Paul Stancliffe

Some of Britain’s most iconic birds can be found during the summer months. Most arrive during the spring but are what we refer to in birding circles as summer visitors, birds like the Cuckoo, the Swallow and the Swift. However, it is not all about icons, the summer months are also the best time to see some of our most fascinating birds – birds like the Nightjar and the Woodcock.

Brian Jones

Summer stars - Draco

01 June 2013 by Brian Jones

Draco is a constellation which appeared in the star catalogues of astronomers over two thousand years ago. It depicts the dragon slain by Hercules during one of his twelve labours.

Paul Stancliffe

Birdwatching Spring 2013

03 March 2013 by Paul Stancliffe

Spring is always an exciting time to be out and about looking for birds – and one of the best ways to enjoy birdlife is to visit distinct habitats.

Wild garlic

Wild Food Spring 2013

03 March 2013 by Sheila Spence

As Spring approaches the first sign of the impending abundance wild food is often Wild Garlic. Lime flowers are usually found later in the Spring, and can be used in soothing herbal tisanes.

Phil Pickin

Signs of spring

03 March 2013 by Phil Pickin

For many people spring is a favorite time of year - new growth gives the countryside a fresh green hue and new life evident almost everywhere you look!

Brian Jones

Spring Stars

03 March 2013 by Brian Jones

Although not particularly bright, Polaris lies in an area of sky devoid of bright stars and therefore stands out quite well.

Sheila

Seashore foraging

12 December 2012 by Sheila Spence

If you are walking by the shore this winter look out for the small shellfish locally available; cockles, mussels , winkles and the lovely long razor clams can be enjoyed throughout the winter months; they all have an ‘r’ in them.

Phil Pickin

Winter tracks

12 December 2012 by Phil Pickin

Winter can sometimes be thought of as a quiet and uninteresting time of year when it comes to wildlife, but there is more out there than you might think – it’s just a matter of knowing what to look for.

Brian Jones

Wintry skies

12 December 2012 by Brian Jones

The winter night sky contains a large number of brilliant stars, making it easier to pick out the various star patterns.

Paul Stancliffe

A Waxwing winter

12 December 2012 by Paul Stancliffe

As the weather turns colder the thoughts of many a birdwatcher turn to those birds that live to the north and east of the UK – birds from northern Scandinavia, north-western Russia and Eastern Europe.

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