Ramblers Scotland’s Equalities Outreach Project

We're breaking down barriers by leading inspiring walks with refugees, asylum seekers and people from Global Majority communities

The Ramblers is working to improve diversity and representation in the outdoors by supporting people from Global Majority communities to benefit from walking.  

Ramblers Scotland’s Equalities Outreach Project aims to break down barriers by leading inspiring walks with refugees, asylum seekers and people from Global Majority communities – while also introducing participants to outdoor skills.   

If you’re working with people from Global Majority communities, we’d love to discuss working together. 

 

Working with partners  

We have teamed up with a wide range of  Global Majority community groups for some great walks since late 2023. That includes members of a Muslim women's group in Glasgow, SCORE Scotland, a national charity promoting racial equality, and The Welcoming, which supports refugees and migrants in Edinburgh.  

Together we have walked local routes on people’s doorsteps, explored what participants want to learn about the outdoors and shared basic navigation, route-planning and safety skills, so they can enjoy more adventures in future too.  

Nasreen, from Amina Muslim Women's Resource Centre, said: "It’s been so good to be out and feel part of nature, and to see the difference it has made for the ladies in our group, and to know that I helped make that happen.” 

 

Aiming to deliver change 

We want to play our part in driving change, to ensure that walking truly is the inclusive activity that it should be.    

Despite Scotland’s abundance of greenspace and world-class access rights, many people still feel the outdoors is not for them.  

Research shows that access to nature isn’t equal and that action is needed to help *everyone* to benefit from walking, especially people from Global Majority backgrounds. 

The Ramblers believes that we all can and should play our part in supporting everyone, no matter their background or ethnicity. 

 

How you can get involved 

We can work with your group to tailor support to fit what your group needs to get walking. That could include in-person training with a member of our staff and forming links with our experienced Ramblers volunteers right across Scotland.  

By the end of the programme, we hope that more refugees, asylum seekers and minority ethnic communities will have had the chance to connect with the outdoors, met new walking partners, challenge themselves and learn new skills. Most importantly, we want people to feel confident and inspired to continue walking. 

Please get in touch by emailing scotland@ramblers.org.uk and we’ll take it from there. 

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