Paths, parks and countryside areas

Barrington Hil

  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Somerset

The reserve represents a large area of species-rich unimproved neutral grassland; a habitat which is now rarely found in England. It has now been permanently opened up for people enjoying the outdoors on foot.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

Axmouth to Lyme Regis Undercliffs

  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Devon

The Undercliffs NNR stretches almost 7 miles in length between Axmouth in the west and Lyme Regis in the east and can be accessed via the South West Coast Path National Trailexternal link which runs through the entire length of the reserve.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

Wye

  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Kent

The reserve is renowned for its views over the Romney Marsh and Weald, and out to the Channel coast. The site is also widely known for landscape features such as the Devil's Kneading Trough, a dry, steep-sided valley formed by peri-glacial action near the end of the last ice age, and for being home to many orchid species.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

Wyre Forest

  • Distance or area: 549 hectares
  • Type: National Nature Reserve
  • Location: Worcestershire

The reserve overlies a plateau containing shales and sandstones of the Upper Carboniferous Coal Measures. The area is heavily faulted, giving rise to steep valleys. Wyre Forest has elements of both lowland and upland woodland and also contains a number of unimproved grassland meadows. Old orchards and areas of scrub also contribute to the variety of habitats present in the reserve.

More information:www.naturalengland.org.uk

Breacon Beacons

  • Distance or area: 1344 sq km
  • Type: National Park
  • Location: Wales

Before the invention of sophisticated satellite systems British monarchs relied on a system of early-warning fires to alert them of an imminent invasion. In South Wales, the pivotal point of this network, visible across fifteen counties, was Pen Y Fan. Over time the beacon leant its name to the entire range of hills extending to either side of it.

More information:www.beacons-npa.gov.uk